Winter Safety Tips

July 1, 2018

winter safety

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Buying in Bulk

April 8, 2018

I have run across SO many Pinterest ‘pins’ about buying in bulk it’s pathetic.  It actually ONLY depends on what YOU use!

This is the stupidest one I’ve ever read but considering it’s a sheeple I understand and forgive:  10 Things I always buy in bulk

Her list is Tampons, Toilet Paper, Toothbrushes, Shampoo & Conditioner, Vitamins, Beer/Wine/Booze, Laundry Soap, Meat and Diapers.

Those of us who prepare for disasters or WTSHTF know these are only for sheeple.

Tampons & Diapers – these are items full of chemicals that fill up the landfill and become a ecological disaster for our grandchildren and great-grandchildren.  Plus where will you dispose of them ON your land if you’re off grid?  Bury? Burn? Leave on your neighbors land?

Lets look at Tampons 1) they are wrapped in plastic and 2) they use bleached cotton.  Both are not good for your health or your environment.  On top of that, a recent study found that 85% of tampons were contaminated with glyphosate (an herbicide linked to cancer) and that number was 100% when cotton gauze products were tested!

I, personally, cannot use them due to TSS (Toxic Shock Syndrome).  I have an extreeeemly heavy flow which has gotten worse since I’ve started going through menopause.  I use Always Infinity Size 5 Extra Heavy Overnight Pads with wings for work and I go through 5-6 of them in an 9 hour shift!  I change 3 times each night!  Unfortunately I still work in a bar so I need to use these items, but at home I use diaper inserts.  I wash them the same as diapers.  I scrap off blood clots in the toilet, let soak in a peroxide solution in a 5-gallon bucket.

The Diva Cup is another option.  The DivaCup is a reusable, bell-shaped menstrual cup that is worn internally and sits low in the vaginal canal, collecting rather than absorbing your menstrual flow. Menstrual cups have existed since the 1930s when women were searching for an alternative to the choices of the time. Yet, its breakthrough into the feminine hygiene industry is much more recent.

I did the same for Diapers for my youngest.  She has a birth defect – Short Gut/Bowel Syndrome.  When she was in the ICU at Ochner Children’s Hospital she was going through a BAG of Diapers a day! I was on the dole and unable to work so my mother helped me get diapers and glass bottles from St Joseph’s Charity Stores in New Orleans.

Again I dunked cloth diapers in toilet while flushing for poop (yes, seat lid was up to prevent dripping on seat) then putting in 5-gallon bucket with 1 cup of peroxide.  Bleach is bad for the environment and damages newborn skin.  That is when grandma showed me how to make Herbal Salve for her diaper rash due to the highly acidic stool which tore up her little tush. I now sell the formula that my Hungarian Great-Grandmother brought with her from Hungary during WWII and has passed down in our family.

Toilet Paper – We use only single-ply and then ONLY for poop, then use cloth.  We use washcloths or homemade rags.  I wash out the color from mechanic rags and cut them into quarters then whip-stitch the edges and use them in the bathroom instead of TP!  Cleaner and safer for the environment!

Toothbrushes – This we do use and I’m working on a natural toothpaste.  Will update!

Shampoo & Conditioner – Seriously!  Have you read the ingredients?!?!  I make and sell Poo Bars! Commercial products contain so many chemicals that are absorbed into your scalp! The hot water opens the pores of your scalp and the chemicals are absorbed into your bloodstream!  YUCK!!

Also conditioner?  If you use a commercial shampoo then YES you do because they STRIP your scalp of the natural oils needed to protect your skin.  If you use a Poo Bars you only need an Apple Cider Vinegar rinse.  That is just for tangles for long hair.  You don’t need to condition with a natural Poo Bars!

I recommend an Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) with a Mother rinse.  The basic recipe is 1 part ACV to 2 parts water.  I’m at 1/4c ACV to 2c water.  I just use on the ends of my hair.  My hair stops just above my bra line in the back.

Vitamins – Seriously!  If you eat healthy vitamins should not be necessary.  I do up my Iron intake during menstruation due to the blood loss but the blood work I do yearly show no need of artificial vitamins.  If you feel you do, make sure you get an age appropriate multi-vitamin.

Beer/Wine/Liqour – that is personal.  I currently live in VA with brother in law in MD.  The ABC store offers 10% discount for cases but only in MD.  So we order in MD and pick-up when visiting brother in law.  Beer – we make our own.  Wine – every store has $5 friday specials or other 6-pk specials.  So I purchase then.  I do pick up the odd bottle for special occasions but I mostly cook with my wine

Meat & Seafood – I use Zaycon Fresh and because I have a business I have a membership with Restaurant Depot.  BUT those aren’t close to a lot of areas.  You can shop by location or product and the quality is awesome!  You find the date and location that suits your needs.  Get there early because there is a LINE!  You bring a copy of your email.

There are 2 guys on the truck, one checks and the other puts it in your trunk.  You are in a line of cars, when you’re loaded you leave. So simple!

Now it does come in LARGE quantities so be ready when you get home to break it down!  Chicken breasts come in a 20# BOX!!  Two large bags!!

I use a Foodsaver, why?  After 40+ years of trying cheap, pay for quality.  Foodsaver is a brand name product with the clout and warranty behind it.  I’ve gotten those $60 BJ’s ones or Costco or Sam’s Club and they lose their vacuum ability over time and use.  I’ve forgotten a Foodsaver in storage after Katrina and found it and it worked perfectly after being in storage for 2 YEARS!! Your vacuum bags you can get cheaper.

 

Why food expiration dates aren’t that strict

March 21, 2018

Taste of Home

I used to take expiration dates very seriously. I froze my ground beef before the “Use By” date and if my milk’s “Best If Used By” date was yesterday, I’d toss it. The boxed stuffing mix that expired last month? In the garbage. But after researching the different types of “expiration” labels, I learned that food actually lasts longer than I thought.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, food expiration dates refer to food quality, not food safety. Federal regulations do not require that expiration dates be put on meat, poultry, eggs, dairy, cans, and boxed foods (baby formula is the only product that requires an expiration date). They are added as a helpful guide to consumers and retailers. Here are the three most common labels:

Best If Used By

“Best if used by” is all about peak quality of a food item.  (iStock)

This date suggests when a product will be at peak quality. It will still be safe to consume after that date, but the flavor and texture quality will start to go down.

Use By

organic food istock

Perishable items can be eaten after the “use by” date, but don’t wait too long.  (iStock)

This date is usually found on more perishable items, like meat. It’s still OK to consume the product for a short period after the date, but don’t wait too long.

Sell By

Man Scanning Voucher Code In Supermarket With Mobile Phone                        -NOTE TO EDITOR-            -PHONE SCREEN AND BARCODE-                  - CREATED FOR SHOOT-

iStock  (Products should be off shelves after their “sell by” date. )

This date tells retailers when the product should be off the shelves. Sales are one way grocery stores try to get older inventory into consumers’ carts, and it’s usually pretty effective.

“Use by” dates are a great guide for people like you and me, but it comes at a price. A USDA report states that Americans waste about 30 percent of food every year. Part of that is because we follow expiration dates too closely and end up throwing out perfectly good food. It’s such a shame. Luckily, we can change.

Use your best judgment to determine whether or not food should be tossed. Instead of looking at the date, look at the actual food. Does the color look right? Is the odor funky? Has the texture changed? Knowing what food is supposed to look, smell, and feel like is a life skill we all should know. It will stop you from eating food that’s gone bad and prevent you from tossing food too early.

“Pharmacists interviewed say they legally cannot tell the customer they’re getting ripped off”

February 2, 2018

Sen Cassidy slams drug cost clawbacks, demands transparency

Documents uncovered by FOX 8 News show real-life examples of patients going to the pharmacy and getting charged a premium on their medication.  We showed you several cases Wednesday night of customers paying more in copay for drugs than the drugs themselves actually cost.

Now one of the most powerful politicians in Washington wants to get our documents.

“Lee, give me copies of those,” says U.S. Senator Bill Cassidy of Louisiana. “That’s [the information] we’ve been putting together as we intend to build support for what we’re trying to do.”

Pharmacists we interviewed say they legally cannot tell the customer they’re getting ripped off.  But we have examples of four healthcare providers, including a company linked to UnitedHealthcare, paying nothing toward some of their customers’ drug costs.

The insurance company labels it a copay. But in some cases only one person pays – you.

Senator Cassidy (R-Baton Rouge) is a physician and a member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions.  He says that committee tackles the topic of drug pricing.

“It’s an incredibly complicated topic,” Cassidy tells us.  “And there’s not a silver bullet that’s going to address it.  But when you have something like that, it just drives home the need to address it.  And that’s what we’re attempting to do.”

Cassidy says he’s eager to get our information “Absolutely – everywhere I go, people are talking to us about drug costs,” he says.

Patients and customers should know more, Cassidy insists.

“We are building a case that we have to have this transparency of pricing,” he says.

None of these patients knew, even after paying a monthly insurance premium, more money was being taken from them when they went to the pharmacy.  Pharmacists call it a clawbackpatients getting charged more than the cost of the drug, and that money being clawed back from the patient and pharmacy.

The senator agrees, these patients would be better off buying these medications without insurance – but they don’t know that.

“If you give them transparency, then they start to know it,” Cassidy tells us. ”It’s not there right now. Until we have real-life examples… That explains so beautifully what I otherwise struggle to explain – this receipt is worth a thousand words.  Clawback for the person… they would have been better off paying without insurance.”

La. Insurance Commissioner Jim Donelon calls the clawback an additional fee or premium on customers – more money leaving people’s hands, going to large companies to help pad their bottom line.

“The patient is subsidizing the entity which is supposed to be their advocate,” Cassidy notes. “Makes no sense whatsoever.  The patient’s getting hammered.  We have to give the patient the power. We have to mandate that she knows what the insurance company knows and what everyone else knows.  As long as it’s hidden from her, it’s another person’s game.”

Thursday, FOX 8 received statements from Optum, UnitedHealthcare’s pharmacy benefits manager, in response to our request for comment on the apparent clawbacks:

“OptumRx’s pharmacy reimbursement program helps ensure the millions of people we serve have affordable access to the drugs they need by ensuring they pay the lowest price available to them for prescription drugs… Those recouped overpayments are returned to the health plan to reduce overall health plan costs.”

A company spokesman also told us that here is no difference in cost to consumers as a result of its pharmacy benefit program. But local pharmacists we interviewed tell us that is not true, and they say in some cases consumers would save money by buying their medication without insurance.

In Baton Rouge, a bill in the Louisiana State Senate would allow pharmacists to begin telling patients if their medication would be cheaper to buy without insurance. That bill, filed by Lake Charles Sen. Ronnie Johns, has stalled. 

Sources tell FOX 8 that Johns has received pressure from the insurance industry to pull the bill. Sources say Johns used to be a pharmacist, but is now an insurance agent.

http://www.fox8live.com/story/31902373/zurik-cassidy-slams-drug-cost-clawbacks-demands-transparency

Drug consumers seek relief as PBM’s make money hand over fist

February 2, 2018

I stumbled across this article and I thought it would be VERY helpful for anyone who takes meds monthly!  I’m going to sign-up and see what’s going on too!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A few taps on Carol Shoemaker’s phone saves her hundreds of dollars in the pharmacy.

“It’s crazy, it’s distressing,” Shoemaker says, “the amount of money you pay for insurance. I pay between $600 and $700 a month for a premium because I’m a single person, I don’t have a company, you know, getting any discounts with big group insurance policies. So, it’s very distressing – you’re already spending a ton of money on insurance, but you still have to pay for, you know, all of the extra.”

Shoemaker almost paid a lot more for one drug; it cost $613 with her insurance. But instead of using that insurance, Shoemaker logged on to one of those cost-saving prescription apps – in this case, GoodRx – and paid just $272 for the medication.

“For me, that’s just too much money to be throwing out the window,” Shoemaker tells us.

She shows us a printout – her family’s medications, with the savings she found online. Shoemaker says those annual savings add up. “It could be a thousand bucks,” she says.

And last year she could have saved even more: She used her insurance for a $277 cream, but only later found out she could have paid just $11.72 via an app.

“My husband’s going to kill me for that,” she jokes, noting the $260 in missed savings would have bought “a nice pair of shoes.”

Pharmacy benefit managers, or PBM’s, control these costs for your prescription drugs.

“The PBM’s in everyone’s pocket,” warns Doug Hoey, who heads National Community Pharmacists Association. “I mean that literally and figuratively because, in every wallet or purse, that prescription drug card that people carry around, somewhere in the fine print, it’ll usually say the name of the PBM, the pharmacy benefits manager.”

The three biggest PBM’s are CVS/Caremark, Express Scripts and Optum, which is owned by United Healthcare.

“They’re huge,” Hoey says. “They’re probably companies you’ve never heard of. But they’re bigger than the drug manufacturers.”

Here at WVUE/FOX 8, Caremark manages our prescription medication. We compared some of the prices our colleagues were being charged.

We found one antibiotic, Ciprofloxacin that costs $15 through our insurance at the Walmart pharmacy. Using GoodRx, the same medication can be bought for just $4. And we found similar savings on an arthritis drug, Meloxicam.

“It doesn’t make sense,” Hoey says. “It’s counterintuitive. I mean, you stroke a check each month to pay your premium and you expect that to give you some value. And the reality is that, in increasing numbers of cases, if you just did it the good old-fashioned way of paying cash, you might pay less for your prescription.”

FOX 8 investigators reached out to Caremark for comment on this report. They sent us this statement:

Without knowing who the CVS Caremark members are or the details of their prescription transactions, it is not possible for us to look into their situations in order to either explain their experience under their specific coverage plan, or clarify any incorrect or incomplete information you may have been provided.

CVS Caremark is committed to ensuring that our PBM clients and members have access to affordable medications to improve health outcomes.  To that end, our PBM plan members receive the lower price when covered prescriptions are filled by a pharmacy that participates in their plan’s applicable pharmacy network. For example, we set a negotiated rate for generic medications with pharmacies, but if a pharmacy in our network has a cash price for a medication that is less expensive than our negotiated rate, the pharmacy is required to submit that lower price when it processes the prescription claim through Caremark.

We found plenty instances where drug costs on insurance were cheaper than those without. But the lesson remains: A smart consumer needs to shop around, ask for the cash prices on their medications, look online and on apps, and ask the insurance prices, too.

A big case in point: We received a list of medications for employees of the Orleans Parish School Board. In 2016, employees paid $28 for a high blood pressure drug, Lisinopril. But through GoodRx, it would have cost them just $8.

“It does not make sense and it happens a lot,” says Gerald Michel. He runs two pharmacies and he says customers frequently come in and save money paying cash for medication.

Michel wonders if there’s more savings out there.

Take the Orleans Parish School Board – all of those prescriptions add up. Just like your employer may do, taxpayers subsidize part of school employees’ prescription expenses. In 2016, they cost taxpayers $1.5 million.

But savings exist by bypassing those high-priced pharmacy benefit managers or PBM’s. Michel also sits on the Terrebonne Parish Council. Two years ago, he urged the council to dump its PBM and search for a new one.

They found one right here in Louisiana, in Natchitoches. Terrebonne dumped its PBM, Optum; Southern Scripts signed a deal with the parish and saved taxpayers $1.2 million on pharmacy costs last year.

“Ultimately, it’s the person getting the insurance that’s going to be saving the money,” Michel says.

“When you think about $1.2 million for… 3,000 people in that county, or 3,000 employees, and if you extrapolate that over 200 million workers in the United States… I’m not that good a whiz to figure out what that number is, but it has a lot of zeroes,” Hoey says. “It starts at least with a ‘b’, as in billions. And that’s the type of potential savings that’s out there, that’s right under our counties’, employees’, school districts’… That’s right under their noses right now, by not using transparent PBM.”

The head of the pharmacists group says he knows another story of a company saving even more on prescription costs. “They saved 30 percent,” Hoey tells us, “30 percent off their prescription drug spend, which is a lot of money.”

In the meantime, PBM’s are raking in lots of cash; Americans are spending about $400 billion on prescription drugs every year.

“These are very profitable companies,” Hoey notes. “They’re all traded on Wall Street, they have shareholders they have obligations to. And so, yes, they’re going to make sure they’re profitable and are rewarding those shareholders.”

Unless consumers start shopping around, experts warn, those growing profits will come at the expense of pharmacies, consumers and taxpayers.

If you do pay cash for a medication…. It could impact whether you reach your deductible.  so be sure to investigate that.

http://www.fox8live.com/story/37406869/zurik-drug-consumers-seek-relief-as-pbms-make-money-hand-over-fist

  You can read much more in our “Medical Waste” investigation at this link

Medical Waste

Seed Lists

January 31, 2018

I’ve been prepping on an off for several years and at 50 I’ve come to several conclusions:

1) There are TONS of people selling “Seed Kits.”

Yes, but honestly do you eat everything in the kit?  And their price of $50!! WOW!  That is outrageous!  Lowe’s and Home Depot has their seeds out in February and March and guess what?!?  They’re in Mylar!!

So JUST get the veggies you WILL eat.  We’ll go through the list later to help you!

2) They are non-hybrid, non-GMO seeds.

What does that mean?  Non-hybrid?  This means it is the ORIGINAL plant, when you see it in catalogs, online or even look at the package you’ll see a F1.  This means it’s a hybrid.  These are seeds that are cross-pollinated for the aspects and features wanted; ie, juicer, blossom rot resistant, etc.

You cannot save those seeds and re-use them next season, why? They will go back to the characteristic of their parent plant.  You might not like what you get, also sometimes they are sterile!

3) Stick with proven producers.

True, you may not get a s many veggies or they may not be perfectly red but they will grow EVERY year!

4) You need to practice NOW! 

Don’t expect the STHTF and suddenly grow an amazing garden on your first try!  It takes practice and a learning curve.  Even if you only have a window, put a cheap shelf up and practice with herbs.

5) Save your own seeds!

I would recommend marking every 5th plant as a seed plant.  Harvest ONLY for seeds.  That way you’re assured of a viable seed for next years harvest.

Everything in moderation including moderation!

One list pushes the Ark Institute seed list.  Their starter set for $47.  I personally wouldn’t buy it why?  Lets go through the list:

200 – 2 Dry Bean Varieties, 100 Green Beans, 100 Sweet Corn, 100 Snap Peas, 50 Butternut Squash, 25 Zucchini Squash, 100 Sugar Baby Watermelon, 25 Bell Pepper, 300 Parsnips, 200 Beets, 100 Yellow Onions, 200 Spinach, 200 Radishes, 100 Pickling Cucumbers, 200 Kale, 1000 Lettuce, 500 Arugula, 500 Broccoli, 500 Cabbage, 1000 Carrots, 100 Swiss Chard, 100 Brussel Sprouts, 300 – 2 Tomato Varieties

6000 TOTAL SEEDS!

What bean varieties?  I actually have grown seeds from the bags I’ve purchased in the grocery store.  Guess what?  I’m already eating them!!

Green Beans – I loathe green beans.  I can ONLY eat them fresh or pickled for Bloody Mary’s!  When I do make them I only make ONE dish: Saute bacon, remove bacon and in grease cook chopped onions, garlic and small diced red or waxy potatoes (Don’t use baking potateoes as they turn to mush!); I usually add 1/2 cup water, cover and let water cook off which cooks potatoes.  I then remove lid and start to brown potatoes, I then add green beans cut into 1″ segments.  Cook until bright green.  Remove from heat, S&P when you server on plate.  DONE!

Sweet Corn is a misnomer.  IF you pick corn when they are still young then it will be sweet but if you let it mature it becomes field corn. That is the only difference.  I would also get strawberry corn,  It’s an Indian corn which makes amazing popcorn!

Snap Peas is great for snacking, I’d also add snow peas.  Stir fry is quick filling and can use a variety of veggies!

Butternut Squash, I have one word…YUCK!!!  I cannot stand butternut, but I do love Acorn and Blue Hubbard.  Now Blue Hubbard are bland as heck but they can be baked into a pie!!

Zucchini Squash again another I don’t care for.  I prefer Yellow or Crook Neck Squash.  Mum used to stuff them with shrimp (it’s a New Orleans thing!!) dressing and they were tolerable.  I will warn you they are PROLIFIC!  So only start with one or two!  You will ALWAYS find a HUGE one under leaves.  I have shredded them and used them for filler for Banana Walnut Bread. Otherwise not too fond of them.  I also love Mirliton!  The spanish call them Chayote.  In Louisiana we grow them along back fences, they are prolific and wonderful!  Very bland so they’re great at taking on the flavors they’re cooked with!

Sugar Baby Watermelon, nope!  Not a fruit I will EVERY eat.  Can’t stand the smell of them either.  I do like casaba and honeydew though.  Go figure!

Here is from the above list I WILL NOT EAT: Parsnips, Beets, Swiss Chard.  Can’t stand them!

Bell Pepper don’t care for them but I do cook with them because they’re part of the Cajun Trinity.  I dehydrate them and use a tbsp in my gumbo’s.  I just don’t like their flavor.

Yellow Onions are a staple but I love Cipollini onions they are very mild.  I love Red onions and Vidalia onions so I would grow several varieties.  I also love green onion, leeks, and shallots.  So I would have lots of these!

Spinach is awesome but I would go with Malabar spinach.  It’s a perennial that may be “eaten raw in salads, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, or added to soups, stews, tofu dishes, and curries. … Since red-stemmed Malabar spinach can lose a lot of its red color when cooked, perhaps it is best utilized (visually speaking) in raw dishes.” Talk about a versatile veggie!

Radishes not too often.  I can have a couple in salads but not a fan.

Pickling Cucumbers you should actually have a couple varieties.  Eating and pickling.  I also love gherkins so gotta have my baby sweet pickles!

Kale is a good staple.  There are varieties you can use in your garden around your walkway an it does’t look like you’re pepping!  I mix with spinach to make a quickie breakie quiche for us during the winter!

Lettuce – I have several varieties as I also do sprouts.

Arugula I don’t care for the bitterness but hubby loves it.  I make a quickie salad for him with arugula (rocket in the UK), shaved pecerino cheese, lemon juice, truffle oil and fresh cracked pepper.

Broccoli is difficult to grow.  Be warned.  It is awesome and amazing.  I also grow cauliflower.  I roast it for sandwiches and use the immersion blender with a leek and make cauliflower and leek soup!

Cabbage there are several varieties love the red.  great salad blend!

Carrots try several varieties.

Brussel Sprouts are VERY difficult to grow and have a loooooong growing season!

2 Tomato Varieties we have Mom’s Paste, Black Cherokee, a cherry and Roma.  good varieties and lots of veggies.

SO, as you can see not everyone will eat what’s in those seed kits.  Think about what YOU will actually eat, what do you like? What can you trade with? Do you even like veggies! These are some questions only you can answer!  Be honest and then get what YOU will eat.

 

Stop the Bleed

January 27, 2018

Several years ago I was dating a New Orleans Fireman.  We were caught in traffic due to an accident.  He looked at me and asked if I had any tampons or maxi-pads.  I replied yes to both.  I said I worked in a bar and had lots of young ladies who were never prepared so I kept a box of each in my trunk.  I popped the trunk and he rummaged, then ran to help.  He used two tampons in the cut and bandaged them into the wound.  They also contain a clotting agent that helped slow the blood drainage.

I learned several things that day 1) in Louisiana ALL EMS, Fire, Police personnel are required to offer/render aid they are LEGALLY liable and 2) always keep feminine products with you.  What is their main purpose….absorb blood.  While menstrual blood is thicker than arterial blood, these products still do their job.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Bleeding can be caused by a wide variety of issues. Minor injuries such as a scraped knee will need to be cleaned and bandaged. More major injuries could lead to hemorrhaging or massive blood loss. These wounds will need to be treated immediately if the person is going to survive. If possible head to a hospital right away. Call 911 for help, especially if you suspect internal bleeding. It is vital to stop the bleeding as much as possible while you wait for professional medical assistance. Hemorrhaging can cause death in a matter of minutes if not controlled.

Bombings and shootings are sadly becoming the norm. Having a bleeding control kit on the wall near the fire extinguisher or other well-marked areas will save lives. The kit should have a bleeding control dressing, trauma sheers, a permanent marker, tourniquet, gloves, gauze, CPR mask, and an instruction card.

  • Call 911
  • Find a first aid kit or bleeding control kit
  • Keep pressure on the wound
  • Place a tourniquet above the wound to stop the bleeding
  • Maintain pressure until help arrives

You won’t always have a bleeding control kit with you. Jeff Bauman was injured during the Boston Marathon bombing. Someone used a shoelace to tie a tourniquet around his leg and it saved his life. Tourniquets have been used to control bleeding since Alexander the Great. In 1785 Sir Gilbert Blane insisted that all members of the Royal Navy carry a tourniquet with them. Tourniquets control blood loss and save lives. 

How to Make a Tourniquet 

  1. Make sure the area is safe
  2. Put on gloves if available
  3. Clear the wound of clothes or debris
  4. Place firm constant pressure on the wound with gauze or clothes
  5. Use a belt, shoelace, or even a bra to make a tourniquet
  6. Find a stick, flashlight, or pencil to tighten the tourniquet
  7. Wrap the tourniquet above the wound, never on a joint
  8. Tie the stick to the tourniquet and turn it once the bleeding stops tie it in place
  9. Treat the injured person for shock until help arrives
  10. Never move a person with an injury to head, neck, back, or leg

Photo Credit: https://www.artofmanliness.com/2016/09/21/make-use-tourniquet/

Source: https://www.healthline.com/symptom/hemorrhag

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/health/sd-me-stopthebleed-vegas-20171002-story.html

https://www.thereadystore.com/food-storage/18162/stop-the-bleed/

Secret Price Codes That Will Save You Money At Costco

January 14, 2018

https://toughnickel.com/frugal-living/Secret-Codes-Will-Save-You-Money-At-Costco

I stumbled across this article and I thought it would be useful and helpful!

Everyone Loves Costco

Everyone loves Costco and we all know they have terrific deals, great prices, quality merchandise, wonderful return policy and the best Hot Dogs with a soda for only $1.50.

Costco like many other stores, runs some of their merchandise at close-out prices. Unfortunately they don’t make it easy for the shopper to know which items are marked down. Many of us have no idea which items are being sold at these lower prices. You can’t tell by simply looking at the price sign on a product that it is a mark-down, special priced item, rebate item or discontinued item or which items will not be replenished when the current stock is sold.

In this article you will discover how find which items are at the lowest costs as well as other facts that I have learned over the many years as an expert Costco shopper.

eBay Power Seller

How I Started

I was an eBay Power Seller for many years and made extra money each year by buying close-outs and special items at Costco. I purchased their sale or close-outs and resold them at higher prices on eBay and did over $60,000 in gross sales in one year alone.

You don’t have to buy to resell their goods, but you can save yourself thousands of dollars if you know their pricing codes. Read this article and follow my directions to save a bundle.

This article will illustrate how Costco prices these special sale items and how you can take advantage of the bargains once you understand their system.

Now some say that I shouldn’t give up my professional secrets and like a magic trick, should never publish it and share it with the world. But I disagree and in these very difficult times, I think it is in everyone’s best interest if we all share our tips and tricks on how to be a smarter shopper.

So if you like this article and find it helps you save money at Costco a recommendation, positive comment and your promise to pass the link to my article to every Costco member you know would be my payment in full.

This article has disclosed the concept of Secret Pricing policies at Costco as well as other stores. I decided to share these secrets with Hubpages readers years ago, and over the years my tips and secrets have appeared in the media, became the basis for many other “Secret Codes” articles and has spawned hundreds of new Frugal Living websites. Nice to be a pioneer.

Steps To Saving Money At Costco

When you visit your local Costco, pay special attention to the price tags for each item.

You will notice that most items end with a 99¢ ending. That’s the regularly priced merchandise. Other items may be priced or end with other numbers like .49¢ .79¢, .89¢ or 97¢. Now most of these are not significant, with one exception .97¢. Items ending with a .97¢ ending are items that have been marked-down. As you go through the store, look for the .97¢ endings, you will find quite a few throughout the store, even on food items.

Tips and Tricks For Better Shopping At Costco

One Florida Costco Actually Printed The Original Price.
One Florida Costco Actually Printed The Original Price.
This is the typical way they will show their marked down items.
This is the typical way they will show their marked down items.

Look For The Asterisk and the Date

The Basics

1. You are going to look for items that now have a 97¢ ending. Regular priced items usually end with a 99¢ ending but not always. However, the ones with the 97¢ endings are those items that did not sell and must be cleared out. They are marked-down, but unlike all other retailers, Costco doesn’t like you to know this, so the don’t put the original prices with a slash and than the new price as many stores do. So to take advantage of these special deals, you have to know the code to know it is a close-out.

On a side note, just because it is a close-out or marked down, in some cases it might only be a very small mark down, so it is good to know what the original price was. You can ask their manager to tell you the original prices on these items if you copy and give them the item numbers before you make your purchase.

Remember, not all markdowns are deals. I have seen some items only marked down $1, at times when there is a large inventory. Don’t rush to purchase if there is a large inventory of that item wait until the inventory and the price is lower.

2. Always look to see if there is an asterisk * on the upper right corner of the sign. If you see one, it means this item is not being restocked. What ever remaining stock you see is all that they have. This is a tip that it might be a marked down item, but not always. It does let you know that once these are gone there will be no more. I use this guide to determine if I should stock up on a discounted item, knowing that the store inventory is all there is.

3. Odd pricing like those that end in a 79¢, 49¢, 89¢ and others are usually regular priced merchandise. At times Costco also gets special deals from their vendors and will pass them on to their customers, however, those items with a .97¢ ending are your close-outs. Easy to remember when you are shopping at Costco.

Manager Specials: You may also see some odd and end merchandise on a flat truck or in an area of the store that has an 88¢ or .00 endings. These usually are Manager Markdowns taken at the store on returned but sellable merchandise (may have a damaged box of package).

They can be display goods or a few end of inventory items that they no longer want on the regular display. They will generally put these in a special area of the store so they don’t take up valuable real estate. They will usually have the original price or close-out price printed sign and using a magic marker will cross out that price write in a new price that might say “Last One”.

I don’t pay much attention to these unless I can use the item for personal use. Some are floor samples and are not first quality merchandise anymore.

If you need it buy it if the deal is right, but remember, it really has to be at a great discount, you may be buying used or damaged merchandise….of course you can always return it too.

Other Ways To Save

Other Money Saving Tips

Now as you go through the store, you will begin to notice another special deal, the Instant Rebates on some items. Generally these will come from the manufacturers and Costco will give you the rebate on the items at the cash register. I like these a lot and you can watch for them at certain times of the year. I buy my Sonicare Toothbrush system and refills during these rebates, because I can save $20 or more on a $100 item. Same holds true for many other items, including food.

You will find a number of these in their monthly coupon books. No need to clip coupons anymore, the discount will be deducted from your order. Check your receipts to be sure it was.

Other instant rebates are also available, especially the ones that qualify for your States Energy Rebate program. Now that they have found the fluorescent bulbs contain Mercury and are actually harmful to the environment, you will see loads of the newer LED lights also available now with State funded Energy Instant Rebate Programs.

In New Jersey and other states you can get a substantial rebate at the cash register to entice you to switch over from your old energy consuming bulbs to these new high output bulbs no polluting varieties. They still offer rebates on the fluorescent bulbs, but I for one, have donated all that I had and converted every light in my home to the newer LED’s. The time to stock up is when you see these state rebates. This happens usually once or twice a year.

Seasonal Mark-Downs

Holiday Mark-Downs
Holiday Mark-Downs
Seasonal Mark-Downs
Seasonal Mark-Downs

Watch for Holiday or change of season close-outs…

As the Holiday Seasons, like Christmas, start to wind down, you need to get into the store and look for marked down items. Generally depending on when the inventory hit the store for that holiday is an indication of the first items to be marked down.

Quite often they will get seasonal merchandise or holiday goods in very early. I know by the amount of inventory they bring in and the type of merchandise if it will be a potential mark down. So I wait and watch the items I want to buy.

Certain items are always marked down. Wrapping paper, Christmas cards and other items are going to be marked down. Buy them and hold them for the next year. In the summer they always have lawn furniture, large flower pots, lawn chemicals and other items need to be sold at any price. Watch for the deal.

When the inventories start to get really low it is wise to scoop them up before they are gone. Dealers and others will clean them out fast if there is limited stock and resell them the following year as I might.

Tip: If you know certain items may be gone by the time you get back to the store to purchase them, buy them a few days before even if they are at full price. When they get marked down, go to the customer service area and get a refund on the difference. Costco has a 30 day price protection policy and will do this for you.

The only caveat on this move is you have to be pretty sure they have enough inventory and WILL BE MARKING THIS DOWN. in order to get a price adjustment. If they never marked it down, the only option you have is to return it with your receipt for a full refund.

For a more extensive look of Holiday deals, click the link below and see my article that will give you tips on saving even more on Holiday purchases.

Instant and Manufacturer Rebates

Even More Markdowns

Vendor Mark-Downs – Items that are not selling as well as they should are a prime target for a manufacturer mark-down. If it wasn’t a direct import by Costco corporate (Kirkland Brand), Costco will go back to the vendor (manufacturer) and request an allowance from them to enable them to reduce the price of that merchandise. These will be the items to look for and will either have a Manufacturers Instant Rebate tag or a markdown price ending in .97¢.

I usually take note of an item that doesn’t seem to be moving and wait patiently for the price reduction. If it is on the shelves for months and each time you visit you still see the same inventory there and it is not a staple item (food, etc.) you can be sure it will be reduced, so be patient if there is something you want to purchase, but think it is still a bit higher then you would like to pay. I have scored on tools and other items this way.

Food Mark-Downs

Yes you can also score big on some Food items too. Anything with an expiration date on it can and will be marked down as the date gets short. I have purchased many food items at 80% off the original price. As you know many of these will not spoil for years after the Best Used date on the package.

Note* Consumer Reports recently wrote that the expiration or Best Used Date has little to do with spoilage. Each manufacturer determines the dates that their products will taste the best, but does not mean they should not be consumed.

* Take A Camera, Smart Phone or iPad… Today I check prices on mark-downs immediately in the store. If you don’t have that capability to do so, than by all means, record the prices on items so you can go home and check them on the internet to see just how good the deals really are.

* Resellers and Gift Givers…If you need them for gifts or for resale and they have that asterisk * on the upper right side, then buy what you need and don’t wait if you see their inventory is low, they won’t be getting any more.

* Coupon Specials…Take advantage of their coupon book specials and instant rebates as well. If you decide later you don’t need them, or have a change of heart, just bring them back.

Remember to keep your receipt in case the prices have been reduced. Members receive a promotional booklet each month with loads of coupons and special offers stock up on some of the basic items like paper towels, toilet paper, they usually alternate every other month on these items. Costco does not accept manufacturer coupons.

Always Save Receipts Especially On Large Purchases
Always Save Receipts Especially On Large Purchases

Price Protection • Returns

* Price Protection Guarantee…If the prices do go lower on the close-outs, or items you purchased at full price, you can always bring the items back and repurchase them at the lower price. Remember, they do have a price adjustment policy on an item for 30 days too.

Beyond The 30 Day Guarantee…If you see the item you bought at full price go on sale and it is beyond the 30 days the only other method it to purchase another one at the lower price. Than take your original receipt for the same item you purchased at the higher price and return the one you just bought at the sale price with that first receipt. I know Costco won’t like me telling you this, but it is the only way I know to get around that 30 day price adjustment policy.

* Keep All Your Receipts…The single most important tip in this article is to hold onto every receipt from your Costco purchases. I keep mine in a little folder in date order. I also keep those for electronic items, larger purchases, etc. in a separate stack. Here is the reason. Costco has a satisfaction guarantee on all the products they sell. If for any reason you are not satisfied with the item in that time you can return it within 2 years, yup, 2 years.

Now If you kept your receipts, it makes this process easier and you will be credited for the original amount you paid. If not and they can’t locate your purchase in their computer, if they can’t find it , they may only offer you the lowest price the item sold for. As you already know it could be the marked-down price. So this is why keeping your receipts will be the one of the most important tips in this article.

* Return Policy…Costco has the best return policy of any retailer around. Try not to abuse it and try not to take unfair advantage of their liberal satisfaction guarantee. I have seen people bring back a bunch of dead cut flowers after they have had them in their homes for a week and get their money back. In this economy we don’t want Costco to either go out of business or change their wonderful customer service policies.

Exceptions: On most items, but not all, you can return it if not satisfied up to two years in some cases. However on computers, certain electronic items and cameras the policy is now 90 Days, but to still keep their customers happy, they now have their own support system to help you resolve any issues with the products. Those items are clearly marked so you understand their policy on these special items.

Member Services

Small sampling of their many member services
Small sampling of their many member services

Member Services and Perks

Member Services…Costco has formed relationships with many other companies to bring you even more services. Visit their website to see a full list of the many services to all members.

http://www.costco.com/services.html

Other Executive Member Perks… Executive Members also receive special pricing on goods and services too.

This includes additional savings or perks on these Costco Programs: Auto Purchase, Auto & Home Insurance, Mortgage & Refinancing, Boat and RV Loans, Gp Daddy websites and online solutions, Water Delivery Services, Identity Protection, Mexico Travel Auto Insurance, Online Investing with ING Direct, Personal or Business Checks (an additional 20% off member pricing), Business Phone Services, Merchant Credit Card Processing, and Costco Travel.

Now I will bet most of you never realized Costco has so many other programs set up to save you even more money. Check them out too.

Risk Free 100% Membership Guarantee…If for any reason you are not happy with your membership, Costco will refund your full membership fee if you are ever dissatisfied.

As you go through the store, you may notice another deal: instant rebates. Generally these will come from the manufacturers and Costco will give you the rebate on the items at the cash register. I like these a lot and you can find them at certain times of the year. I buy my Sonicare Toothbrush system and refills during these rebates, because I can save $20 or more on a $100 item. Same holds true for many other items, including food.

You will also find a number of instant rebates in the monthly coupon books. No need to clip coupons anymore, the discount will be deducted from your order. Check your receipts to be sure it was.

Shopping Strategies: Vendor Markdowns

Poorly performing items are prime candidates for a manufacturer mark-down. Unless it’s Costco’s own Kirkland brand, the store will often go back to the vendor (manufacturer) and request a price reduction. These items will have either a Manufacturers Instant Rebate tag or a markdown price ending in .97¢.

I usually take note of an item that doesn’t seem to be moving and will wait patiently for the price reduction. If it is on the shelves for months and each time you visit you still see the same inventory there, you can be fairly confident the item will be marked down. So, be patient if there’s something you want to purchase but can’t or don’t want to pay the full price.I’ve gotten great deals on tools and similar items this way.

The best produce anywhere
The best produce anywhere

Save Money via Member Services

Costco has formed relationships with many other companies to bring you even more services. Look at this list for some of the services offered to all members.

Executive membership perks. Executive members also receive special pricing on goods and services too. This includes additional savings or perks on these Costco programs:

  • Auto Purchase
  • Auto & Home Insurance
  • Mortgages & Refinancing
  • Boat and RV Loans
  • Go Daddy Online Solutions
  • Water Delivery Services
  • Identity Protection
  • Mexico Travel Auto Insurance,
  • Online Investing with ING Direct
  • Personal or Business Checks (an additional 20% off member pricing)
  • Business Phone Services
  • Merchant Credit Card Processing
  • Costco Travel.


Get cash back. Executive Members receive a 2% Reward (up to $750 per year) on most Costco purchases, as well as additional benefits and bigger discounts on many of their services. If you do the math, you will be paying an additional $55 per year over the cost of their Business or Gold Star membership. So, if you spend an average of $245 per month, your reward will cover the additional cost to become an Executive Member. Who doesn’t spend that much each month at Costco? Seems like a no-brainer!

Risk-free 100% membership guarantee. If for any reason you are not happy with your membership, Costco will refund your full membership fee.

Costco Co-Branded Credit Card

For the past 16 years Costco and American Express offered Costco members a co-branded card that was used as a membership card as well. It offered cash bonus rewards at the end of each year on all purchases Costco and others. Currently, customers can use any American Express card at checkout in addition to their MasterCard and Visa debit cards.

On April 1, 2015 that relationship will end and Costco who will now offer a co-branded Citi Visa card will become Costco’s exclusive card. We still don’t have information on the rewards if any on the new Visa card, but will report it when it is clear.

Food Court & Free Food Sampling

Costco has become the food destination for many shoppers and still offers a Jumbo All Beef Hot Dog and Soda with FREE refills for only $1.50
Costco has become the food destination for many shoppers and still offers a Jumbo All Beef Hot Dog and Soda with FREE refills for only $1.50

The Biggest Bargain At Costco. Some people like to hit the food court after they shop. For me, it is better to go to the food court before I hit the Racetrack. Many buy their 1/4 pound all beef hot dog and a soda with free refills for only $1.50.

Costco now produces their own Hot Dogs and has sold over 100 million…that is a lot of beef. Of course you can refill your free soda as many times as you like. Good idea to get your dog and soda before you shop and then use your soda refill to wash down all the tasty samples I’ll be enjoying as I move throughout the store.

Calorie Counters Look: Ask the counter person to pull out their calorie chart and see how many calories in each item. The Hot Dogs according to their calorie chart has 500 calories, a slice of plain pizza is 700, loaded is more.

So if you are watching your diet, you may want to try the lowest calorie item on their menu, the soft serve yogurt. Only 300 calories for a nice 15 ounce cup. I like their vanilla yogurt best, the chocolate tends to have a powdery taste. Add the strawberry topping and you are adding a lot more calories.

Food Samples

Costco offer more sampling of products then any other retailer I know. The reason is simple…not only do they generate business on products you might never purchase, but by offering you all these samples as you stroll through their stores, it encourages you to stay longer or even look forward to your visit.

Did You Like This Article?

I hope you have enjoyed reading this article on Costco. Please recommend the article to others. I very much appreciate all of your comments and encouragement and I will keep updating this article as I get new information. If you’ve made your own discoveries about how to save money at Costco, please share them in the comments below.

This article and its contents are protected and registered with the US Copyright Office, registration number TX-7-941-665, year of publication 2009.

Executive Order: Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements

January 30, 2017

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/01/25/executive-order-border-security-and-immigration-enforcement-improvements

EXECUTIVE ORDER

– – – – – – –

BORDER SECURITY AND IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT IMPROVEMENTS

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq.) (INA), the Secure Fence Act of 2006 (Public Law 109 367) (Secure Fence Act), and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (Public Law 104 208 Div. C) (IIRIRA), and in order to ensure the safety and territorial integrity of the United States as well as to ensure that the Nation’s immigration laws are faithfully executed, I hereby order as follows:

Section 1.  Purpose.  Border security is critically important to the national security of the United States.  Aliens who illegally enter the United States without inspection or admission present a significant threat to national security and public safety.  Such aliens have not been identified or inspected by Federal immigration officers to determine their admissibility to the United States.  The recent surge of illegal immigration at the southern border with Mexico has placed a significant strain on Federal resources and overwhelmed agencies charged with border security and immigration enforcement, as well as the local communities into which many of the aliens are placed.

Transnational criminal organizations operate sophisticated drug- and human-trafficking networks and smuggling operations on both sides of the southern border, contributing to a significant increase in violent crime and United States deaths from dangerous drugs.  Among those who illegally enter are those who seek to harm Americans through acts of terror or criminal conduct.  Continued illegal immigration presents a clear and present danger to the interests of the United States.

Federal immigration law both imposes the responsibility and provides the means for the Federal Government, in cooperation with border States, to secure the Nation’s southern border.  Although Federal immigration law provides a robust framework for Federal-State partnership in enforcing our immigration laws    and the Congress has authorized and provided appropriations to secure our borders    the Federal Government has failed to discharge this basic sovereign responsibility.  The purpose of this order is to direct executive departments and agencies (agencies) to deploy all lawful means to secure the Nation’s southern border, to prevent further illegal immigration into the United States, and to repatriate illegal aliens swiftly, consistently, and humanely.

Sec. 2.  Policy.  It is the policy of the executive branch to:

(a)  secure the southern border of the United States through the immediate construction of a physical wall on the southern border, monitored and supported by adequate personnel so as to prevent illegal immigration, drug and human trafficking, and acts of terrorism;

(b)  detain individuals apprehended on suspicion of violating Federal or State law, including Federal immigration law, pending further proceedings regarding those violations;

(c)  expedite determinations of apprehended individuals’ claims of eligibility to remain in the United States;

(d)  remove promptly those individuals whose legal claims to remain in the United States have been lawfully rejected, after any appropriate civil or criminal sanctions have been imposed; and

(e)  cooperate fully with States and local law enforcement in enacting Federal-State partnerships to enforce Federal immigration priorities, as well as State monitoring and detention programs that are consistent with Federal law and do not undermine Federal immigration priorities.

Sec. 3.  Definitions.  (a)  “Asylum officer” has the meaning given the term in section 235(b)(1)(E) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1225(b)(1)).

(b)  “Southern border” shall mean the contiguous land border between the United States and Mexico, including all points of entry.

(c)  “Border States” shall mean the States of the United States immediately adjacent to the contiguous land border between the United States and Mexico.

(d)  Except as otherwise noted, “the Secretary” shall refer to the Secretary of Homeland Security.

(e)  “Wall” shall mean a contiguous, physical wall or other similarly secure, contiguous, and impassable physical barrier.

(f)  “Executive department” shall have the meaning given in section 101 of title 5, United States Code.

(g)  “Regulations” shall mean any and all Federal rules, regulations, and directives lawfully promulgated by agencies.

(h)  “Operational control” shall mean the prevention of all unlawful entries into the United States, including entries by terrorists, other unlawful aliens, instruments of terrorism, narcotics, and other contraband.

Sec. 4.  Physical Security of the Southern Border of the United States.  The Secretary shall immediately take the following steps to obtain complete operational control, as determined by the Secretary, of the southern border:

(a)  In accordance with existing law, including the Secure Fence Act and IIRIRA, take all appropriate steps to immediately plan, design, and construct a physical wall along the southern border, using appropriate materials and technology to most effectively achieve complete operational control of the southern border;

(b)  Identify and, to the extent permitted by law, allocate all sources of Federal funds for the planning, designing, and constructing of a physical wall along the southern border;

(c)  Project and develop long-term funding requirements for the wall, including preparing Congressional budget requests for the current and upcoming fiscal years; and

(d)  Produce a comprehensive study of the security of the southern border, to be completed within 180 days of this order, that shall include the current state of southern border security, all geophysical and topographical aspects of the southern border, the availability of Federal and State resources necessary to achieve complete operational control of the southern border, and a strategy to obtain and maintain complete operational control of the southern border.

Sec. 5.  Detention Facilities.  (a)  The Secretary shall take all appropriate action and allocate all legally available resources to immediately construct, operate, control, or establish contracts to construct, operate, or control facilities to detain aliens at or near the land border with Mexico.

(b)  The Secretary shall take all appropriate action and allocate all legally available resources to immediately assign asylum officers to immigration detention facilities for the purpose of accepting asylum referrals and conducting credible fear determinations pursuant to section 235(b)(1) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1225(b)(1)) and applicable regulations and reasonable fear determinations pursuant to applicable regulations.

(c)  The Attorney General shall take all appropriate action and allocate all legally available resources to immediately assign immigration judges to immigration detention facilities operated or controlled by the Secretary, or operated or controlled pursuant to contract by the Secretary, for the purpose of conducting proceedings authorized under title 8, chapter 12, subchapter II, United States Code.

Sec. 6.  Detention for Illegal Entry.  The Secretary shall immediately take all appropriate actions to ensure the detention of aliens apprehended for violations of immigration law pending the outcome of their removal proceedings or their removal from the country to the extent permitted by law.  The Secretary shall issue new policy guidance to all Department of Homeland Security personnel regarding the appropriate and consistent use of lawful detention authority under the INA, including the termination of the practice commonly known as “catch and release,” whereby aliens are routinely released in the United States shortly after their apprehension for violations of immigration law.

Sec. 7.  Return to Territory.  The Secretary shall take appropriate action, consistent with the requirements of section 1232 of title 8, United States Code, to ensure that aliens described in section 235(b)(2)(C) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1225(b)(2)(C)) are returned to the territory from which they came pending a formal removal proceeding.

Sec. 8.  Additional Border Patrol Agents.  Subject to available appropriations, the Secretary, through the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, shall take all appropriate action to hire 5,000 additional Border Patrol agents, and all appropriate action to ensure that such agents enter on duty and are assigned to duty stations as soon as is practicable.

Sec. 9.  Foreign Aid Reporting Requirements.  The head of each executive department and agency shall identify and quantify all sources of direct and indirect Federal aid or assistance to the Government of Mexico on an annual basis over the past five years, including all bilateral and multilateral development aid, economic assistance, humanitarian aid, and military aid.  Within 30 days of the date of this order, the head of each executive department and agency shall submit this information to the Secretary of State.  Within 60 days of the date of this order, the Secretary shall submit to the President a consolidated report reflecting the levels of such aid and assistance that has been provided annually, over each of the past five years.

Sec. 10.  Federal-State Agreements.  It is the policy of the executive branch to empower State and local law enforcement agencies across the country to perform the functions of an immigration officer in the interior of the United States to the maximum extent permitted by law.

(a)  In furtherance of this policy, the Secretary shall immediately take appropriate action to engage with the Governors of the States, as well as local officials, for the purpose of preparing to enter into agreements under section 287(g) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1357(g)).

(b)  To the extent permitted by law, and with the consent of State or local officials, as appropriate, the Secretary shall take appropriate action, through agreements under section 287(g) of the INA, or otherwise, to authorize State and local law enforcement officials, as the Secretary determines are qualified and appropriate, to perform the functions of immigration officers in relation to the investigation, apprehension, or detention of aliens in the United States under the direction and the supervision of the Secretary.  Such authorization shall be in addition to, rather than in place of, Federal performance of these duties.

(c)  To the extent permitted by law, the Secretary may structure each agreement under section 287(g) of the INA in the manner that provides the most effective model for enforcing Federal immigration laws and obtaining operational control over the border for that jurisdiction.

Sec. 11.  Parole, Asylum, and Removal.  It is the policy of the executive branch to end the abuse of parole and asylum provisions currently used to prevent the lawful removal of removable aliens.

(a)  The Secretary shall immediately take all appropriate action to ensure that the parole and asylum provisions of Federal immigration law are not illegally exploited to prevent the removal of otherwise removable aliens.

(b)  The Secretary shall take all appropriate action, including by promulgating any appropriate regulations, to ensure that asylum referrals and credible fear determinations pursuant to section 235(b)(1) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1125(b)(1)) and 8 CFR 208.30, and reasonable fear determinations pursuant to 8 CFR 208.31, are conducted in a manner consistent with the plain language of those provisions.

(c)  Pursuant to section 235(b)(1)(A)(iii)(I) of the INA, the Secretary shall take appropriate action to apply, in his sole and unreviewable discretion, the provisions of section 235(b)(1)(A)(i) and (ii) of the INA to the aliens designated under section 235(b)(1)(A)(iii)(II).

(d)  The Secretary shall take appropriate action to ensure that parole authority under section 212(d)(5) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(5)) is exercised only on a case-by-case basis in accordance with the plain language of the statute, and in all circumstances only when an individual demonstrates urgent humanitarian reasons or a significant public benefit derived from such parole.

(e)  The Secretary shall take appropriate action to require that all Department of Homeland Security personnel are properly trained on the proper application of section 235 of the William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 (8 U.S.C. 1232) and section 462(g)(2) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 279(g)(2)), to ensure that unaccompanied alien children are properly processed, receive appropriate care and placement while in the custody of the Department of Homeland Security, and, when appropriate, are safely repatriated in accordance with law.

Sec. 12.  Authorization to Enter Federal Lands.  The Secretary, in conjunction with the Secretary of the Interior and any other heads of agencies as necessary, shall take all appropriate action to:

(a)  permit all officers and employees of the United States, as well as all State and local officers as authorized by the Secretary, to have access to all Federal lands as necessary and appropriate to implement this order; and

(b)  enable those officers and employees of the United States, as well as all State and local officers as authorized by the Secretary, to perform such actions on Federal lands as the Secretary deems necessary and appropriate to implement this order.

Sec. 13.  Priority Enforcement.  The Attorney General shall take all appropriate steps to establish prosecution guidelines and allocate appropriate resources to ensure that Federal prosecutors accord a high priority to prosecutions of offenses having a nexus to the southern border.

Sec. 14.  Government Transparency.  The Secretary shall, on a monthly basis and in a publicly available way, report statistical data on aliens apprehended at or near the southern border using a uniform method of reporting by all Department of Homeland Security components, in a format that is easily understandable by the public.

Sec. 15.  Reporting.  Except as otherwise provided in this order, the Secretary, within 90 days of the date of this order, and the Attorney General, within 180 days, shall each submit to the President a report on the progress of the directives contained in this order.

Sec. 16.  Hiring.  The Office of Personnel Management shall take appropriate action as may be necessary to facilitate hiring personnel to implement this order.

Sec. 17.  General Provisions.  (a)  Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i)   the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii)  the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b)  This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c)  This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

DONALD J. TRUMP

THE WHITE HOUSE,
January 25, 2017.

H.R.2029 – Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016

January 30, 2017

https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/2029/text

 

8 U.S. Code § 1182 – Inadmissible aliens

January 30, 2017

https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/8/1182

(a) Classes of aliens ineligible for visas or admissionExcept as otherwise provided in this chapter, aliens who are inadmissible under the following paragraphs are ineligible to receive visas and ineligible to be admitted to the United States:

(1) Health-related grounds

(A) In generalAny alien—

(i)

who is determined (in accordance with regulations prescribed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services) to have a communicable disease of public health significance; [1]
(ii)

except as provided in subparagraph (C), who seeks admission as an immigrant, or who seeks adjustment of status to the status of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence, and who has failed to present documentation of having received vaccination against vaccine-preventable diseases, which shall include at least the following diseases: mumps, measles, rubella, polio, tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, pertussis, influenza type B and hepatitis B, and any other vaccinations against vaccine-preventable diseases recommended by the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices,
(iii) who is determined (in accordance with regulations prescribed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services in consultation with the Attorney General)—

(I)

to have a physical or mental disorder and behavior associated with the disorder that may pose, or has posed, a threat to the property, safety, or welfare of the alien or others, or
(II)

to have had a physical or mental disorder and a history of behavior associated with the disorder, which behavior has posed a threat to the property, safety, or welfare of the alien or others and which behavior is likely to recur or to lead to other harmful behavior, or
(iv)

who is determined (in accordance with regulations prescribed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services) to be a drug abuser or addict,
is inadmissible.
(B) Waiver authorized

For provision authorizing waiver of certain clauses of subparagraph (A), see subsection (g).

(C) Exception from immunization requirement for adopted children 10 years of age or youngerClause (ii) of subparagraph (A) shall not apply to a child who—

(i)

is 10 years of age or younger,
(ii)

is described in subparagraph (F) or (G) of section 1101(b)(1) of this title; 1 and
(iii)

is seeking an immigrant visa as an immediate relative under section 1151(b) of this title,
if, prior to the admission of the child, an adoptive parent or prospective adoptive parent of the child, who has sponsored the child for admission as an immediate relative, has executed an affidavit stating that the parent is aware of the provisions of subparagraph (A)(ii) and will ensure that, within 30 days of the child’s admission, or at the earliest time that is medically appropriate, the child will receive the vaccinations identified in such subparagraph.
(2) Criminal and related grounds

(A) Conviction of certain crimes

(i) In generalExcept as provided in clause (ii), any alien convicted of, or who admits having committed, or who admits committing acts which constitute the essential elements of—

(I)

a crime involving moral turpitude (other than a purely political offense) or an attempt or conspiracy to commit such a crime, or
(II)

a violation of (or a conspiracy or attempt to violate) any law or regulation of a State, the United States, or a foreign country relating to a controlled substance (as defined in section 802 of title 21),
 is inadmissible.
(ii) ExceptionClause (i)(I) shall not apply to an alien who committed only one crime if—

(I)

the crime was committed when the alien was under 18 years of age, and the crime was committed (and the alien released from any confinement to a prison or correctional institution imposed for the crime) more than 5 years before the date of application for a visa or other documentation and the date of application for admission to the United States, or
(II)

the maximum penalty possible for the crime of which the alien was convicted (or which the alien admits having committed or of which the acts that the alien admits having committed constituted the essential elements) did not exceed imprisonment for one year and, if the alien was convicted of such crime, the alien was not sentenced to a term of imprisonment in excess of 6 months (regardless of the extent to which the sentence was ultimately executed).
(B) Multiple criminal convictions

Any alien convicted of 2 or more offenses (other than purely political offenses), regardless of whether the conviction was in a single trial or whether the offenses arose from a single scheme of misconduct and regardless of whether the offenses involved moral turpitude, for which the aggregate sentences to confinement were 5 years or more is inadmissible.

(C) Controlled substance traffickersAny alien who the consular officer or the Attorney General knows or has reason to believe—

(i)

is or has been an illicit trafficker in any controlled substance or in any listed chemical (as defined in section 802 of title 21), or is or has been a knowing aider, abettor, assister, conspirator, or colluder with others in the illicit trafficking in any such controlled or listed substance or chemical, or endeavored to do so; or
(ii)

is the spouse, son, or daughter of an alien inadmissible under clause (i), has, within the previous 5 years, obtained any financial or other benefit from the illicit activity of that alien, and knew or reasonably should have known that the financial or other benefit was the product of such illicit activity,
is inadmissible.
(D) Prostitution and commercialized viceAny alien who—

(i)

is coming to the United States solely, principally, or incidentally to engage in prostitution, or has engaged in prostitution within 10 years of the date of application for a visa, admission, or adjustment of status,
(ii)

directly or indirectly procures or attempts to procure, or (within 10 years of the date of application for a visa, admission, or adjustment of status) procured or attempted to procure or to import, prostitutes or persons for the purpose of prostitution, or receives or (within such 10-year period) received, in whole or in part, the proceeds of prostitution, or
(iii)

is coming to the United States to engage in any other unlawful commercialized vice, whether or not related to prostitution,
is inadmissible.
(E) Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecutionAny alien—

(i)

who has committed in the United States at any time a serious criminal offense (as defined in section 1101(h) of this title),
(ii)

for whom immunity from criminal jurisdiction was exercised with respect to that offense,
(iii)

who as a consequence of the offense and exercise of immunity has departed from the United States, and
(iv)

who has not subsequently submitted fully to the jurisdiction of the court in the United States having jurisdiction with respect to that offense,
is inadmissible.
(F) Waiver authorized

For provision authorizing waiver of certain subparagraphs of this paragraph, see subsection (h).

(G) Foreign government officials who have committed particularly severe violations of religious freedom

Any alien who, while serving as a foreign government official, was responsible for or directly carried out, at any time, particularly severe violations of religious freedom, as defined in section 6402 of title 22, is inadmissible.

(H) Significant traffickers in persons

(i) In general

Any alien who commits or conspires to commit human trafficking offenses in the United States or outside the United States, or who the consular officer, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of State, or the Attorney General knows or has reason to believe is or has been a knowing aider, abettor, assister, conspirator, or colluder with such a trafficker in severe forms of trafficking in persons, as defined in the section 7102 of title 22, is inadmissible.

(ii) Beneficiaries of trafficking

Except as provided in clause (iii), any alien who the consular officer or the Attorney General knows or has reason to believe is the spouse, son, or daughter of an alien inadmissible under clause (i), has, within the previous 5 years, obtained any financial or other benefit from the illicit activity of that alien, and knew or reasonably should have known that the financial or other benefit was the product of such illicit activity, is inadmissible.

(iii) Exception for certain sons and daughters

Clause (ii) shall not apply to a son or daughter who was a child at the time he or she received the benefit described in such clause.

(I) Money launderingAny alien—

(i)

who a consular officer or the Attorney General knows, or has reason to believe, has engaged, is engaging, or seeks to enter the United States to engage, in an offense which is described in section 1956 or 1957 of title 18(relating to laundering of monetary instruments); or
(ii)

who a consular officer or the Attorney General knows is, or has been, a knowing aider, abettor, assister, conspirator, or colluder with others in an offense which is described in such section;
is inadmissible.
(3) Security and related grounds

(A) In generalAny alien who a consular officer or the Attorney General knows, or has reasonable ground to believe, seeks to enter the United States to engage solely, principally, or incidentally in—

(i)

any activity (I) to violate any law of the United States relating to espionage or sabotage or (II) to violate or evade any law prohibiting the export from the United States of goods, technology, or sensitive information,
(ii)

any other unlawful activity, or
(iii)

any activity a purpose of which is the opposition to, or the control or overthrow of, the Government of the United States by force, violence, or other unlawful means,
is inadmissible.
(B) Terrorist activities

(i) In generalAny alien who—

(I)

has engaged in a terrorist activity;
(II)

a consular officer, the Attorney General, or the Secretary of Homeland Security knows, or has reasonable ground to believe, is engaged in or is likely to engage after entry in any terrorist activity (as defined in clause (iv));
(III)

has, under circumstances indicating an intention to cause death or serious bodily harm, incited terrorist activity;
(IV) is a representative (as defined in clause (v)) of—

(aa)

a terrorist organization (as defined in clause (vi)); or
(bb)

a political, social, or other group that endorses or espouses terrorist activity;
(V)

is a member of a terrorist organization described in subclause (I) or (II) of clause (vi);
(VI)

is a member of a terrorist organization described in clause (vi)(III), unless the alien can demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence that the alien did not know, and should not reasonably have known, that the organization was a terrorist organization;
(VII)

endorses or espouses terrorist activity or persuades others to endorse or espouse terrorist activity or support a terrorist organization;
(VIII)

has received military-type training (as defined in section 2339D(c)(1) of title 18) from or on behalf of any organization that, at the time the training was received, was a terrorist organization (as defined in clause (vi)); or
(IX)

is the spouse or child of an alien who is inadmissible under this subparagraph, if the activity causing the alien to be found inadmissible occurred within the last 5 years,
 is inadmissible. An alien who is an officer, official, representative, or spokesman of the Palestine Liberation Organization is considered, for purposes of this chapter, to be engaged in a terrorist activity.
(ii) ExceptionSubclause (IX) of clause (i) does not apply to a spouse or child—

(I)

who did not know or should not reasonably have known of the activity causing the alien to be found inadmissible under this section; or
(II)

whom the consular officer or Attorney General has reasonable grounds to believe has renounced the activity causing the alien to be found inadmissible under this section.
(iii) “Terrorist activity” definedAs used in this chapter, the term “terrorist activity” means any activity which is unlawful under the laws of the place where it is committed (or which, if it had been committed in the United States, would be unlawful under the laws of the United States or any State) and which involves any of the following:

(I)

The highjacking or sabotage of any conveyance (including an aircraft, vessel, or vehicle).
(II)

The seizing or detaining, and threatening to kill, injure, or continue to detain, another individual in order to compel a third person (including a governmental organization) to do or abstain from doing any act as an explicit or implicit condition for the release of the individual seized or detained.
(III)

A violent attack upon an internationally protected person (as defined in section 1116(b)(4) of title 18) or upon the liberty of such a person.
(IV)

An assassination.
(V) The use of any—

(a)

biological agent, chemical agent, or nuclear weapon or device, or
(b)

explosive, firearm, or other weapon or dangerous device (other than for mere personal monetary gain),
  with intent to endanger, directly or indirectly, the safety of one or more individuals or to cause substantial damage to property.
(VI)

A threat, attempt, or conspiracy to do any of the foregoing.
(iv) “Engage in terrorist activity” definedAs used in this chapter, the term “engage in terrorist activity” means, in an individual capacity or as a member of an organization—

(I)

to commit or to incite to commit, under circumstances indicating an intention to cause death or serious bodily injury, a terrorist activity;
(II)

to prepare or plan a terrorist activity;
(III)

to gather information on potential targets for terrorist activity;
(IV) to solicit funds or other things of value for—

(aa)

a terrorist activity;
(bb)

a terrorist organization described in clause (vi)(I) or (vi)(II); or
(cc)

a terrorist organization described in clause (vi)(III), unless the solicitor can demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence that he did not know, and should not reasonably have known, that the organization was a terrorist organization;
(V) to solicit any individual—

(aa)

to engage in conduct otherwise described in this subsection;
(bb)

for membership in a terrorist organization described in clause (vi)(I) or (vi)(II); or
(cc)

for membership in a terrorist organization described in clause (vi)(III) unless the solicitor can demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence that he did not know, and should not reasonably have known, that the organization was a terrorist organization; or
(VI) to commit an act that the actor knows, or reasonably should know, affords material support, including a safe house, transportation, communications, funds, transfer of funds or other material financial benefit, false documentation or identification, weapons (including chemical, biological, or radiological weapons), explosives, or training—

(aa)

for the commission of a terrorist activity;
(bb)

to any individual who the actor knows, or reasonably should know, has committed or plans to commit a terrorist activity;
(cc)

to a terrorist organization described in subclause (I) or (II) of clause (vi) or to any member of such an organization; or
(dd)

to a terrorist organization described in clause (vi)(III), or to any member of such an organization, unless the actor can demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence that the actor did not know, and should not reasonably have known, that the organization was a terrorist organization.
(v) “Representative” defined

As used in this paragraph, the term “representative” includes an officer, official, or spokesman of an organization, and any person who directs, counsels, commands, or induces an organization or its members to engage in terrorist activity.

(vi) “Terrorist organization” definedAs used in this section, the term “terrorist organization” means an organization—

(I)

designated under section 1189 of this title;
(II)

otherwise designated, upon publication in the Federal Register, by the Secretary of State in consultation with or upon the request of the Attorney General or the Secretary of Homeland Security, as a terrorist organization, after finding that the organization engages in the activities described in subclauses (I) through (VI) of clause (iv); or
(III)

that is a group of two or more individuals, whether organized or not, which engages in, or has a subgroup which engages in, the activities described in subclauses (I) through (VI) of clause (iv).
(C) Foreign policy

(i) In general

An alien whose entry or proposed activities in the United States the Secretary of State has reasonable ground to believe would have potentially serious adverse foreign policy consequences for the United States is inadmissible.

(ii) Exception for officials

An alien who is an official of a foreign government or a purported government, or who is a candidate for election to a foreign government office during the period immediately preceding the election for that office, shall not be excludable or subject to restrictions or conditions on entry into the United States under clause (i) solely because of the alien’s past, current, or expected beliefs, statements, or associations, if such beliefs, statements, or associations would be lawful within the United States.

(iii) Exception for other aliens

An alien, not described in clause (ii), shall not be excludable or subject to restrictions or conditions on entry into the United States under clause (i) because of the alien’s past, current, or expected beliefs, statements, or associations, if such beliefs, statements, or associations would be lawful within the United States, unless the Secretary of State personally determines that the alien’s admission would compromise a compelling United States foreign policy interest.

(iv) Notification of determinations

If a determination is made under clause (iii) with respect to an alien, the Secretary of State must notify on a timely basis the chairmen of the Committees on the Judiciary and Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and of the Committees on the Judiciary and Foreign Relations of the Senate of the identity of the alien and the reasons for the determination.

(D) Immigrant membership in totalitarian party

(i) In general

Any immigrant who is or has been a member of or affiliated with the Communist or any other totalitarian party (or subdivision or affiliate thereof), domestic or foreign, is inadmissible.

(ii) Exception for involuntary membership

Clause (i) shall not apply to an alien because of membership or affiliation if the alien establishes to the satisfaction of the consular officer when applying for a visa (or to the satisfaction of the Attorney General when applying for admission) that the membership or affiliation is or was involuntary, or is or was solely when under 16 years of age, by operation of law, or for purposes of obtaining employment, food rations, or other essentials of living and whether necessary for such purposes.

(iii) Exception for past membershipClause (i) shall not apply to an alien because of membership or affiliation if the alien establishes to the satisfaction of the consular officer when applying for a visa (or to the satisfaction of the Attorney General when applying for admission) that—

(I) the membership or affiliation terminated at least—

(a)

2 years before the date of such application, or
(b)

5 years before the date of such application, in the case of an alien whose membership or affiliation was with the party controlling the government of a foreign state that is a totalitarian dictatorship as of such date, and
(II)

the alien is not a threat to the security of the United States.
(iv) Exception for close family members

The Attorney General may, in the Attorney General’s discretion, waive the application of clause (i) in the case of an immigrant who is the parent, spouse, son, daughter, brother, or sister of a citizen of the United States or a spouse, son, or daughter of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence for humanitarian purposes, to assure family unity, or when it is otherwise in the public interest if the immigrant is not a threat to the security of the United States.

(E) Participants in Nazi persecution, genocide, or the commission of any act of torture or extrajudicial killing

(i) Participation in Nazi persecutionsAny alien who, during the period beginning on March 23, 1933, and ending on May 8, 1945, under the direction of, or in association with—

(I)

the Nazi government of Germany,
(II)

any government in any area occupied by the military forces of the Nazi government of Germany,
(III)

any government established with the assistance or cooperation of the Nazi government of Germany, or
(IV)

any government which was an ally of the Nazi government of Germany,
 ordered, incited, assisted, or otherwise participated in the persecution of any person because of race, religion, national origin, or political opinion is inadmissible.
(ii) Participation in genocide

Any alien who ordered, incited, assisted, or otherwise participated in genocide, as defined in section 1091(a) of title 18, is inadmissible.

(iii) Commission of acts of torture or extrajudicial killingsAny alien who, outside the United States, has committed, ordered, incited, assisted, or otherwise participated in the commission of—

(I)

any act of torture, as defined in section 2340 of title 18; or
(II)

under color of law of any foreign nation, any extrajudicial killing, as defined in section 3(a) of the Torture Victim Protection Act of 1991 (28 U.S.C. 1350 note),
 is inadmissible.
(F) Association with terrorist organizations

Any alien who the Secretary of State, after consultation with the Attorney General, or the Attorney General, after consultation with the Secretary of State, determines has been associated with a terrorist organization and intends while in the United States to engage solely, principally, or incidentally in activities that could endanger the welfare, safety, or security of the United States is inadmissible.

(G) Recruitment or use of child soldiers

Any alien who has engaged in the recruitment or use of child soldiers in violation of section 2442 of title 18 is inadmissible.

(4) Public charge

(A) In general

Any alien who, in the opinion of the consular officer at the time of application for a visa, or in the opinion of the Attorney General at the time of application for admission or adjustment of status, is likely at any time to become a public charge is inadmissible.

(B) Factors to be taken into account

(i) In determining whether an alien is inadmissible under this paragraph, the consular officer or the Attorney General shall at a minimum consider the alien’s—

(I)

age;
(II)

health;
(III)

family status;
(IV)

assets, resources, and financial status; and
(V)

education and skills.
(ii)

In addition to the factors under clause (i), the consular officer or the Attorney General may also consider any affidavit of support under section 1183a of this title for purposes of exclusion under this paragraph.
(C) Family-sponsored immigrantsAny alien who seeks admission or adjustment of status under a visa number issued under section 1151(b)(2) or 1153(a) of this title is inadmissible under this paragraph unless—

(i) the alien has obtained—

(I)

status as a spouse or a child of a United States citizen pursuant to clause (ii), (iii), or (iv) of section 1154(a)(1)(A) of this title;
(II)

classification pursuant to clause (ii) or (iii) of section 1154(a)(1)(B) of this title; or
(III)

classification or status as a VAWA self-petitioner; or
(ii)

the person petitioning for the alien’s admission (and any additional sponsor required under section 1183a(f) of this title or any alternative sponsor permitted under paragraph (5)(B) of such section) has executed an affidavit of support described in section 1183a of this title with respect to such alien.
(D) Certain employment-based immigrants

Any alien who seeks admission or adjustment of status under a visa number issued under section 1153(b) of this title by virtue of a classification petition filed by a relative of the alien (or by an entity in which such relative has a significant ownership interest) is inadmissible under this paragraph unless such relative has executed an affidavit of support described in section 1183a of this title with respect to such alien.

(E) Special rule for qualified alien victimsSubparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) shall not apply to an alien who—

(i)

is a VAWA self-petitioner;
(ii)

is an applicant for, or is granted, nonimmigrant status under section 1101(a)(15)(U) of this title; or
(iii)

is a qualified alien described in section 1641(c) of this title.
(5) Labor certification and qualifications for certain immigrants

(A) Labor certification

(i) In generalAny alien who seeks to enter the United States for the purpose of performing skilled or unskilled labor is inadmissible, unless the Secretary of Labor has determined and certified to the Secretary of State and the Attorney General that—

(I)

there are not sufficient workers who are able, willing, qualified (or equally qualified in the case of an alien described in clause (ii)) and available at the time of application for a visa and admission to the United States and at the place where the alien is to perform such skilled or unskilled labor, and
(II)

the employment of such alien will not adversely affect the wages and working conditions of workers in the United States similarly employed.
(ii) Certain aliens subject to special ruleFor purposes of clause (i)(I), an alien described in this clause is an alien who—

(I)

is a member of the teaching profession, or
(II)

has exceptional ability in the sciences or the arts.
(iii) Professional athletes

(I) In general

A certification made under clause (i) with respect to a professional athlete shall remain valid with respect to the athlete after the athlete changes employer, if the new employer is a team in the same sport as the team which employed the athlete when the athlete first applied for the certification.

(II) “Professional athlete” definedFor purposes of subclause (I), the term “professional athlete” means an individual who is employed as an athlete by—

(aa)

a team that is a member of an association of 6 or more professional sports teams whose total combined revenues exceed $10,000,000 per year, if the association governs the conduct of its members and regulates the contests and exhibitions in which its member teams regularly engage; or
(bb)

any minor league team that is affiliated with such an association.
(iv) Long delayed adjustment applicants

A certification made under clause (i) with respect to an individual whose petition is covered by section 1154(j) of this title shall remain valid with respect to a new job accepted by the individual after the individual changes jobs or employers if the new job is in the same or a similar occupational classification as the job for which the certification was issued.

(B) Unqualified physicians

An alien who is a graduate of a medical school not accredited by a body or bodies approved for the purpose by the Secretary of Education (regardless of whether such school of medicine is in the United States) and who is coming to the United States principally to perform services as a member of the medical profession is inadmissible, unless the alien (i) has passed parts I and II of the National Board of Medical Examiners Examination (or an equivalent examination as determined by the Secretary of Health and Human Services) and (ii) is competent in oral and written English. For purposes of the previous sentence, an alien who is a graduate of a medical school shall be considered to have passed parts I and II of the National Board of Medical Examiners if the alien was fully and permanently licensed to practice medicine in a State on January 9, 1978, and was practicing medicine in a State on that date.

(C) Uncertified foreign health-care workersSubject to subsection (r), any alien who seeks to enter the United States for the purpose of performing labor as a health-care worker, other than a physician, is inadmissible unless the alien presents to the consular officer, or, in the case of an adjustment of status, the Attorney General, a certificate from the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools, or a certificate from an equivalent independent credentialing organization approved by the Attorney General in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, verifying that—

(i) the alien’s education, training, license, and experience—

(I)

meet all applicable statutory and regulatory requirements for entry into the United States under the classification specified in the application;
(II)

are comparable with that required for an American health-care worker of the same type; and
(III)

are authentic and, in the case of a license, unencumbered;
(ii)

the alien has the level of competence in oral and written English considered by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with the Secretary of Education, to be appropriate for health care work of the kind in which the alien will be engaged, as shown by an appropriate score on one or more nationally recognized, commercially available, standardized assessments of the applicant’s ability to speak and write; and
(iii)

if a majority of States licensing the profession in which the alien intends to work recognize a test predicting the success on the profession’s licensing or certification examination, the alien has passed such a test or has passed such an examination.
For purposes of clause (ii), determination of the standardized tests required and of the minimum scores that are appropriate are within the sole discretion of the Secretary of Health and Human Services and are not subject to further administrative or judicial review.
(D) Application of grounds

The grounds for inadmissibility of aliens under subparagraphs (A) and (B) shall apply to immigrants seeking admission or adjustment of status under paragraph (2) or (3) of section 1153(b) of this title.

(6) Illegal entrants and immigration violators

(A) Aliens present without admission or parole

(i) In general

An alien present in the United States without being admitted or paroled, or who arrives in the United States at any time or place other than as designated by the Attorney General, is inadmissible.

(ii) Exception for certain battered women and childrenClause (i) shall not apply to an alien who demonstrates that—

(I)

the alien is a VAWA self-petitioner;
(II)

(a)

the alien has been battered or subjected to extreme cruelty by a spouse or parent, or by a member of the spouse’s or parent’s family residing in the same household as the alien and the spouse or parent consented or acquiesced to such battery or cruelty, or (b) the alien’s child has been battered or subjected to extreme cruelty by a spouse or parent of the alien (without the active participation of the alien in the battery or cruelty) or by a member of the spouse’s or parent’s family residing in the same household as the alien when the spouse or parent consented to or acquiesced in such battery or cruelty and the alien did not actively participate in such battery or cruelty, and
(III)

there was a substantial connection between the battery or cruelty described in subclause (I) or (II) and the alien’s unlawful entry into the United States.
(B) Failure to attend removal proceeding

Any alien who without reasonable cause fails or refuses to attend or remain in attendance at a proceeding to determine the alien’s inadmissibility or deportability and who seeks admission to the United States within 5 years of such alien’s subsequent departure or removal is inadmissible.

(C) Misrepresentation

(i) In general

Any alien who, by fraud or willfully misrepresenting a material fact, seeks to procure (or has sought to procure or has procured) a visa, other documentation, or admission into the United States or other benefit provided under this chapter is inadmissible.

(ii) Falsely claiming citizenship

(I) In general

Any alien who falsely represents, or has falsely represented, himself or herself to be a citizen of the United States for any purpose or benefit under this chapter (including section 1324a of this title) or any other Federal or State law is inadmissible.

(II) Exception

In the case of an alien making a representation described in subclause (I), if each natural parent of the alien (or, in the case of an adopted alien, each adoptive parent of the alien) is or was a citizen (whether by birth or naturalization), the alien permanently resided in the United States prior to attaining the age of 16, and the alien reasonably believed at the time of making such representation that he or she was a citizen, the alien shall not be considered to be inadmissible under any provision of this subsection based on such representation.

(iii) Waiver authorized

For provision authorizing waiver of clause (i), see subsection (i).

(D) Stowaways

Any alien who is a stowaway is inadmissible.

(E) Smugglers

(i) In general

Any alien who at any time knowingly has encouraged, induced, assisted, abetted, or aided any other alien to enter or to try to enter the United States in violation of law is inadmissible.

(ii) Special rule in the case of family reunification

Clause (i) shall not apply in the case of alien who is an eligible immigrant (as defined in section 301(b)(1) of the Immigration Act of 1990), was physically present in the United States on May 5, 1988, and is seeking admission as an immediate relative or under section 1153(a)(2) of this title (including under section 112 of the Immigration Act of 1990) or benefits under section 301(a) of the Immigration Act of 1990 if the alien, before May 5, 1988, has encouraged, induced, assisted, abetted, or aided only the alien’s spouse, parent, son, or daughter (and no other individual) to enter the United States in violation of law.

(iii) Waiver authorized

For provision authorizing waiver of clause (i), see subsection (d)(11).

(F) Subject of civil penalty

(i) In general

An alien who is the subject of a final order for violation of section 1324c of this title is inadmissible.

(ii) Waiver authorized

For provision authorizing waiver of clause (i), see subsection (d)(12).

(G) Student visa abusers

An alien who obtains the status of a nonimmigrant under section 1101(a)(15)(F)(i) of this title and who violates a term or condition of such status under section 1184(l) [2] of this title is inadmissible until the alien has been outside the United States for a continuous period of 5 years after the date of the violation.

(7) Documentation requirements

(A) Immigrants

(i) In generalExcept as otherwise specifically provided in this chapter, any immigrant at the time of application for admission—

(I)

who is not in possession of a valid unexpired immigrant visa, reentry permit, border crossing identification card, or other valid entry document required by this chapter, and a valid unexpired passport, or other suitable travel document, or document of identity and nationality if such document is required under the regulations issued by the Attorney General under section 1181(a) of this title, or
(II)

whose visa has been issued without compliance with the provisions of section 1153 of this title,
 is inadmissible.
(ii) Waiver authorized

For provision authorizing waiver of clause (i), see subsection (k).

(B) Nonimmigrants

(i) In generalAny nonimmigrant who—

(I)

is not in possession of a passport valid for a minimum of six months from the date of the expiration of the initial period of the alien’s admission or contemplated initial period of stay authorizing the alien to return to the country from which the alien came or to proceed to and enter some other country during such period, or
(II)

is not in possession of a valid nonimmigrant visa or border crossing identification card at the time of application for admission,
 is inadmissible.
(ii) General waiver authorized

For provision authorizing waiver of clause (i), see subsection (d)(4).

(iii) Guam and Northern Mariana Islands visa waiver

For provision authorizing waiver of clause (i) in the case of visitors to Guam or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, see subsection (l).

(iv) Visa waiver program

For authority to waive the requirement of clause (i) under a program, see section 1187 of this title.

(8) Ineligible for citizenship

(A) In general

Any immigrant who is permanently ineligible to citizenship is inadmissible.

(B) Draft evaders

Any person who has departed from or who has remained outside the United States to avoid or evade training or service in the armed forces in time of war or a period declared by the President to be a national emergency is inadmissible, except that this subparagraph shall not apply to an alien who at the time of such departure was a nonimmigrant and who is seeking to reenter the United States as a nonimmigrant.

(9) Aliens previously removed

(A) Certain aliens previously removed

(i) Arriving aliens

Any alien who has been ordered removed under section 1225(b)(1) of this title or at the end of proceedings under section 1229a of this title initiated upon the alien’s arrival in the United States and who again seeks admission within 5 years of the date of such removal (or within 20 years in the case of a second or subsequent removal or at any time in the case of an alien convicted of an aggravated felony) is inadmissible.

(ii) Other aliensAny alien not described in clause (i) who—

(I)

has been ordered removed under section 1229a of this title or any other provision of law, or
(II)

departed the United States while an order of removal was outstanding,
 and who seeks admission within 10 years of the date of such alien’s departure or removal (or within 20 years of such date in the case of a second or subsequent removal or at any time in the case of an alien convicted of an aggravated felony) is inadmissible.
(iii) Exception

Clauses (i) and (ii) shall not apply to an alien seeking admission within a period if, prior to the date of the alien’s reembarkation at a place outside the United States or attempt to be admitted from foreign contiguous territory, the Attorney General has consented to the alien’s reapplying for admission.

(B) Aliens unlawfully present

(i) In generalAny alien (other than an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence) who—

(I)

was unlawfully present in the United States for a period of more than 180 days but less than 1 year, voluntarily departed the United States (whether or not pursuant to section 1254a(e) [3] of this title) prior to the commencement of proceedings under section 1225(b)(1) of this title or section 1229a of this title, and again seeks admission within 3 years of the date of such alien’s departure or removal, or
(II)

has been unlawfully present in the United States for one year or more, and who again seeks admission within 10 years of the date of such alien’s departure or removal from the United States,
 is inadmissible.
(ii) Construction of unlawful presence

For purposes of this paragraph, an alien is deemed to be unlawfully present in the United States if the alien is present in the United States after the expiration of the period of stay authorized by the Attorney General or is present in the United States without being admitted or paroled.

(iii) Exceptions

(I) Minors

No period of time in which an alien is under 18 years of age shall be taken into account in determining the period of unlawful presence in the United States under clause (i).

(II) Asylees

No period of time in which an alien has a bona fide application for asylum pending under section 1158 of this title shall be taken into account in determining the period of unlawful presence in the United States under clause (i) unless the alien during such period was employed without authorization in the United States.

(III) Family unity

No period of time in which the alien is a beneficiary of family unity protection pursuant to section 301 of the Immigration Act of 1990 shall be taken into account in determining the period of unlawful presence in the United States under clause (i).

(IV) Battered women and children

Clause (i) shall not apply to an alien who would be described in paragraph (6)(A)(ii) if “violation of the terms of the alien’s nonimmigrant visa” were substituted for “unlawful entry into the United States” in subclause (III) of that paragraph.

(V) Victims of a severe form of trafficking in persons

Clause (i) shall not apply to an alien who demonstrates that the severe form of trafficking (as that term is defined in section 7102 of title 22) was at least one central reason for the alien’s unlawful presence in the United States.

(iv) Tolling for good causeIn the case of an alien who—

(I)

has been lawfully admitted or paroled into the United States,
(II)

has filed a nonfrivolous application for a change or extension of status before the date of expiration of the period of stay authorized by the Attorney General, and
(III)

has not been employed without authorization in the United States before or during the pendency of such application,
 the calculation of the period of time specified in clause (i)(I) shall be tolled during the pendency of such application, but not to exceed 120 days.
(v) Waiver

The Attorney General has sole discretion to waive clause (i) in the case of an immigrant who is the spouse or son or daughter of a United States citizen or of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence, if it is established to the satisfaction of the Attorney General that the refusal of admission to such immigrant alien would result in extreme hardship to the citizen or lawfully resident spouse or parent of such alien. No court shall have jurisdiction to review a decision or action by the Attorney General regarding a waiver under this clause.

(C) Aliens unlawfully present after previous immigration violations

(i) In generalAny alien who—

(I)

has been unlawfully present in the United States for an aggregate period of more than 1 year, or
(II)

has been ordered removed under section 1225(b)(1) of this title, section 1229a of this title, or any other provision of law,
 and who enters or attempts to reenter the United States without being admitted is inadmissible.
(ii) Exception

Clause (i) shall not apply to an alien seeking admission more than 10 years after the date of the alien’s last departure from the United States if, prior to the alien’s reembarkation at a place outside the United States or attempt to be readmitted from a foreign contiguous territory, the Secretary of Homeland Security has consented to the alien’s reapplying for admission.

(iii) WaiverThe Secretary of Homeland Security may waive the application of clause (i) in the case of an alien who is a VAWA self-petitioner if there is a connection between—

(I)

the alien’s battering or subjection to extreme cruelty; and
(II)

the alien’s removal, departure from the United States, reentry or reentries into the United States; or attempted reentry into the United States.
(10) Miscellaneous

(A) Practicing polygamists

Any immigrant who is coming to the United States to practice polygamy is inadmissible.

(B) Guardian required to accompany helpless alienAny alien—

(i)

who is accompanying another alien who is inadmissible and who is certified to be helpless from sickness, mental or physical disability, or infancy pursuant to section 1222(c) of this title, and
(ii)

whose protection or guardianship is determined to be required by the alien described in clause (i),
is inadmissible.
(C) International child abduction

(i) In general

Except as provided in clause (ii), any alien who, after entry of an order by a court in the United States granting custody to a person of a United States citizen child who detains or retains the child, or withholds custody of the child, outside the United States from the person granted custody by that order, is inadmissible until the child is surrendered to the person granted custody by that order.

(ii) Aliens supporting abductors and relatives of abductorsAny alien who—

(I)

is known by the Secretary of State to have intentionally assisted an alien in the conduct described in clause (i),
(II)

is known by the Secretary of State to be intentionally providing material support or safe haven to an alien described in clause (i), or
(III)

is a spouse (other than the spouse who is the parent of the abducted child), child (other than the abducted child), parent, sibling, or agent of an alien described in clause (i), if such person has been designated by the Secretary of State at the Secretary’s sole and unreviewable discretion, is inadmissible until the child described in clause (i) is surrendered to the person granted custody by the order described in that clause, and such person and child are permitted to return to the United States or such person’s place of residence.
(iii) ExceptionsClauses (i) and (ii) shall not apply—

(I)

to a government official of the United States who is acting within the scope of his or her official duties;
(II)

to a government official of any foreign government if the official has been designated by the Secretary of State at the Secretary’s sole and unreviewable discretion; or
(III)

so long as the child is located in a foreign state that is a party to the Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, done at The Hague on October 25, 1980.
(D) Unlawful voters

(i) In general

Any alien who has voted in violation of any Federal, State, or local constitutional provision, statute, ordinance, or regulation is inadmissible.

(ii) Exception

In the case of an alien who voted in a Federal, State, or local election (including an initiative, recall, or referendum) in violation of a lawful restriction of voting to citizens, if each natural parent of the alien (or, in the case of an adopted alien, each adoptive parent of the alien) is or was a citizen (whether by birth or naturalization), the alien permanently resided in the United States prior to attaining the age of 16, and the alien reasonably believed at the time of such violation that he or she was a citizen, the alien shall not be considered to be inadmissible under any provision of this subsection based on such violation.

(E) Former citizens who renounced citizenship to avoid taxation

Any alien who is a former citizen of the United States who officially renounces United States citizenship and who is determined by the Attorney General to have renounced United States citizenship for the purpose of avoiding taxation by the United States is inadmissible.

(b) Notices of denials

(1) Subject to paragraphs (2) and (3), if an alien’s application for a visa, for admission to the United States, or for adjustment of status is denied by an immigration or consular officer because the officer determines the alien to be inadmissible under subsection (a), the officer shall provide the alien with a timely written notice that—

(A)

states the determination, and
(B)

lists the specific provision or provisions of law under which the alien is inadmissible or adjustment [4] of status.
(2)

The Secretary of State may waive the requirements of paragraph (1) with respect to a particular alien or any class or classes of inadmissible aliens.
(3)

Paragraph (1) does not apply to any alien inadmissible under paragraph (2) or (3) of subsection (a).
(c) Repealed. Pub. L. 104–208, div. C, title III, § 304(b), Sept. 30, 1996, 110 Stat. 3009–597
(d) Temporary admission of nonimmigrants

(1)

The Attorney General shall determine whether a ground for inadmissibility exists with respect to a nonimmigrant described in section 1101(a)(15)(S) of this title. The Attorney General, in the Attorney General’s discretion, may waive the application of subsection (a) (other than paragraph (3)(E)) in the case of a nonimmigrant described in section 1101(a)(15)(S) of this title, if the Attorney General considers it to be in the national interest to do so. Nothing in this section shall be regarded as prohibiting the Immigration and Naturalization Service from instituting removal proceedings against an alien admitted as a nonimmigrant under section 1101(a)(15)(S) of this title for conduct committed after the alien’s admission into the United States, or for conduct or a condition that was not disclosed to the Attorney General prior to the alien’s admission as a nonimmigrant under section 1101(a)(15)(S) of this title.
(2)

Repealed. Pub. L. 101–649, title VI, § 601(d)(2)(A), Nov. 29, 1990, 104 Stat. 5076.
(3)

(A)

Except as provided in this subsection, an alien (i) who is applying for a nonimmigrant visa and is known or believed by the consular officer to be ineligible for such visa under subsection (a) (other than paragraphs (3)(A)(i)(I), (3)(A)(ii), (3)(A)(iii), (3)(C), and clauses (i) and (ii) of paragraph (3)(E) of such subsection), may, after approval by the Attorney General of a recommendation by the Secretary of State or by the consular officer that the alien be admitted temporarily despite his inadmissibility, be granted such a visa and may be admitted into the United States temporarily as a nonimmigrant in the discretion of the Attorney General, or (ii) who is inadmissible under subsection (a) (other than paragraphs (3)(A)(i)(I), (3)(A)(ii), (3)(A)(iii), (3)(C), and clauses (i) and (ii) of paragraph (3)(E) of such subsection), but who is in possession of appropriate documents or is granted a waiver thereof and is seeking admission, may be admitted into the United States temporarily as a nonimmigrant in the discretion of the Attorney General. The Attorney General shall prescribe conditions, including exaction of such bonds as may be necessary, to control and regulate the admission and return of inadmissible aliens applying for temporary admission under this paragraph.
(B)

(i)

The Secretary of State, after consultation with the Attorney General and the Secretary of Homeland Security, or the Secretary of Homeland Security, after consultation with the Secretary of State and the Attorney General, may determine in such Secretary’s sole unreviewable discretion that subsection (a)(3)(B) shall not apply with respect to an alien within the scope of that subsection or that subsection (a)(3)(B)(vi)(III) shall not apply to a group within the scope of that subsection, except that no such waiver may be extended to an alien who is within the scope of subsection (a)(3)(B)(i)(II), no such waiver may be extended to an alien who is a member or representative of, has voluntarily and knowingly engaged in or endorsed or espoused or persuaded others to endorse or espouse or support terrorist activity on behalf of, or has voluntarily and knowingly received military-type training from a terrorist organization that is described in subclause (I) or (II) of subsection (a)(3)(B)(vi), and no such waiver may be extended to a group that has engaged terrorist activity against the United States or another democratic country or that has purposefully engaged in a pattern or practice of terrorist activity that is directed at civilians. Such a determination shall neither prejudice the ability of the United States Government to commence criminal or civil proceedings involving a beneficiary of such a determination or any other person, nor create any substantive or procedural right or benefit for a beneficiary of such a determination or any other person. Notwithstanding any other provision of law (statutory or nonstatutory), including section 2241 of title 28, or any other habeas corpus provision, and sections 1361 and 1651 of such title, no court shall have jurisdiction to review such a determination or revocation except in a proceeding for review of a final order of removal pursuant to section 1252 of this title, and review shall be limited to the extent provided in section 1252(a)(2)(D). The Secretary of State may not exercise the discretion provided in this clause with respect to an alien at any time during which the alien is the subject of pending removal proceedings under section 1229a of this title.
(ii)

Not later than 90 days after the end of each fiscal year, the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Homeland Security shall each provide to the Committees on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives and of the Senate, the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, and the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives a report on the aliens to whom such Secretary has applied clause (i). Within one week of applying clause (i) to a group, the Secretary of State or the Secretary of Homeland Security shall provide a report to such Committees.
(4)

Either or both of the requirements of paragraph (7)(B)(i) of subsection (a) may be waived by the Attorney General and the Secretary of State acting jointly (A) on the basis of unforeseen emergency in individual cases, or (B) on the basis of reciprocity with respect to nationals of foreign contiguous territory or of adjacent islands and residents thereof having a common nationality with such nationals, or (C) in the case of aliens proceeding in immediate and continuous transit through the United States under contracts authorized in section 1223(c) of this title.
(5)

(A)

The Attorney General may, except as provided in subparagraph (B) or in section 1184(f) of this title, in his discretion parole into the United States temporarily under such conditions as he may prescribe only on a case-by-case basis for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit any alien applying for admission to the United States, but such parole of such alien shall not be regarded as an admission of the alien and when the purposes of such parole shall, in the opinion of the Attorney General, have been served the alien shall forthwith return or be returned to the custody from which he was paroled and thereafter his case shall continue to be dealt with in the same manner as that of any other applicant for admission to the United States.
(B)

The Attorney General may not parole into the United States an alien who is a refugee unless the Attorney General determines that compelling reasons in the public interest with respect to that particular alien require that the alien be paroled into the United States rather than be admitted as a refugee under section 1157 of this title.
(6)

Repealed. Pub. L. 101–649, title VI, § 601(d)(2)(A), Nov. 29, 1990, 104 Stat. 5076.
(7)

The provisions of subsection (a) (other than paragraph (7)) shall be applicable to any alien who shall leave Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, or the Virgin Islands of the United States, and who seeks to enter the continental United States or any other place under the jurisdiction of the United States. The Attorney General shall by regulations provide a method and procedure for the temporary admission to the United States of the aliens described in this proviso.[5] Any alien described in this paragraph, who is denied admission to the United States, shall be immediately removed in the manner provided by section 1231(c) of this title.
(8)

Upon a basis of reciprocity accredited officials of foreign governments, their immediate families, attendants, servants, and personal employees may be admitted in immediate and continuous transit through the United States without regard to the provisions of this section except paragraphs (3)(A), (3)(B), (3)(C), and (7)(B) of subsection (a) of this section.
(9)

, (10) Repealed. Pub. L. 101–649, title VI, § 601(d)(2)(A), Nov. 29, 1990, 104 Stat. 5076.
(11)

The Attorney General may, in his discretion for humanitarian purposes, to assure family unity, or when it is otherwise in the public interest, waive application of clause (i) of subsection (a)(6)(E) in the case of any alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence who temporarily proceeded abroad voluntarily and not under an order of removal, and who is otherwise admissible to the United States as a returning resident under section 1181(b) of this title and in the case of an alien seeking admission or adjustment of status as an immediate relative or immigrant under section 1153(a) of this title (other than paragraph (4) thereof), if the alien has encouraged, induced, assisted, abetted, or aided only an individual who at the time of such action was the alien’s spouse, parent, son, or daughter (and no other individual) to enter the United States in violation of law.
(12) The Attorney General may, in the discretion of the Attorney General for humanitarian purposes or to assure family unity, waive application of clause (i) of subsection (a)(6)(F)—

(A)

in the case of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence who temporarily proceeded abroad voluntarily and not under an order of deportation or removal and who is otherwise admissible to the United States as a returning resident under section 1181(b) of this title, and
(B)

in the case of an alien seeking admission or adjustment of status under section 1151(b)(2)(A) of this title or under section 1153(a) of this title,
if no previous civil money penalty was imposed against the alien under section 1324c of this title and the offense was committed solely to assist, aid, or support the alien’s spouse or child (and not another individual). No court shall have jurisdiction to review a decision of the Attorney General to grant or deny a waiver under this paragraph.
(13)

(A)

The Secretary of Homeland Security shall determine whether a ground for inadmissibility exists with respect to a nonimmigrant described in section 1101(a)(15)(T) of this title, except that the ground for inadmissibility described in subsection (a)(4) shall not apply with respect to such a nonimmigrant.
(B) In addition to any other waiver that may be available under this section, in the case of a nonimmigrant described in section 1101(a)(15)(T) of this title, if the Secretary of Homeland Security considers it to be in the national interest to do so, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in the Attorney General’s [6] discretion, may waive the application of—

(i)

subsection (a)(1); and
(ii)

any other provision of subsection (a) (excluding paragraphs (3), (4), (10)(C), and (10(E)) [7] if the activities rendering the alien inadmissible under the provision were caused by, or were incident to, the victimization described in section 1101(a)(15)(T)(i)(I) of this title.
(14)

The Secretary of Homeland Security shall determine whether a ground of inadmissibility exists with respect to a nonimmigrant described in section 1101(a)(15)(U) of this title. The Secretary of Homeland Security, in the Attorney General’s 6 discretion, may waive the application of subsection (a) (other than paragraph (3)(E)) in the case of a nonimmigrant described in section 1101(a)(15)(U) of this title, if the Secretary of Homeland Security considers it to be in the public or national interest to do so.
(e) Educational visitor status; foreign residence requirement; waiver

No person admitted under section 1101(a)(15)(J) of this title or acquiring such status after admission (i) whose participation in the program for which he came to the United States was financed in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, by an agency of the Government of the United States or by the government of the country of his nationality or his last residence, (ii) who at the time of admission or acquisition of status under section 1101(a)(15)(J) of this title was a national or resident of a country which the Director of the United States Information Agency, pursuant to regulations prescribed by him, had designated as clearly requiring the services of persons engaged in the field of specialized knowledge or skill in which the alien was engaged, or (iii) who came to the United States or acquired such status in order to receive graduate medical education or training, shall be eligible to apply for an immigrant visa, or for permanent residence, or for a nonimmigrant visa under section 1101(a)(15)(H) or section 1101(a)(15)(L) of this title until it is established that such person has resided and been physically present in the country of his nationality or his last residence for an aggregate of at least two years following departure from the United States: Provided, That upon the favorable recommendation of the Director, pursuant to the request of an interested United States Government agency (or, in the case of an alien described in clause (iii), pursuant to the request of a State Department of Public Health, or its equivalent), or of the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization after he has determined that departure from the United States would impose exceptional hardship upon the alien’s spouse or child (if such spouse or child is a citizen of the United States or a lawfully resident alien), or that the alien cannot return to the country of his nationality or last residence because he would be subject to persecution on account of race, religion, or political opinion, the Attorney General may waive the requirement of such two-year foreign residence abroad in the case of any alien whose admission to the United States is found by the Attorney General to be in the public interest except that in the case of a waiver requested by a State Department of Public Health, or its equivalent, or in the case of a waiver requested by an interested United States Government agency on behalf of an alien described in clause (iii), the waiver shall be subject to the requirements of section 1184(l) of this title: And provided further, That, except in the case of an alien described in clause (iii), the Attorney General may, upon the favorable recommendation of the Director, waive such two-year foreign residence requirement in any case in which the foreign country of the alien’s nationality or last residence has furnished the Director a statement in writing that it has no objection to such waiver in the case of such alien.

(f) Suspension of entry or imposition of restrictions by President

Whenever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate. Whenever the Attorney General finds that a commercial airline has failed to comply with regulations of the Attorney General relating to requirements of airlines for the detection of fraudulent documents used by passengers traveling to the United States (including the training of personnel in such detection), the Attorney General may suspend the entry of some or all aliens transported to the United States by such airline.

(g) Bond and conditions for admission of alien inadmissible on health-related groundsThe Attorney General may waive the application of—

(1) subsection (a)(1)(A)(i) in the case of any alien who—

(A)

is the spouse or the unmarried son or daughter, or the minor unmarried lawfully adopted child, of a United States citizen, or of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence, or of an alien who has been issued an immigrant visa,
(B)

has a son or daughter who is a United States citizen, or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence, or an alien who has been issued an immigrant visa; or
(C)

is a VAWA self-petitioner,
in accordance with such terms, conditions, and controls, if any, including the giving of bond, as the Attorney General, in the discretion of the Attorney General after consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, may by regulation prescribe;
(2) subsection (a)(1)(A)(ii) in the case of any alien—

(A)

who receives vaccination against the vaccine-preventable disease or diseases for which the alien has failed to present documentation of previous vaccination,
(B)

for whom a civil surgeon, medical officer, or panel physician (as those terms are defined by section 34.2 of title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations) certifies, according to such regulations as the Secretary of Health and Human Services may prescribe, that such vaccination would not be medically appropriate, or
(C)

under such circumstances as the Attorney General provides by regulation, with respect to whom the requirement of such a vaccination would be contrary to the alien’s religious beliefs or moral convictions; or
(3)

subsection (a)(1)(A)(iii) in the case of any alien, in accordance with such terms, conditions, and controls, if any, including the giving of bond, as the Attorney General, in the discretion of the Attorney General after consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, may by regulation prescribe.
(h) Waiver of subsection (a)(2)(A)(i)(I), (II), (B), (D), and (E)The Attorney General may, in his discretion, waive the application of subparagraphs (A)(i)(I), (B), (D), and (E) of subsection (a)(2) and subparagraph (A)(i)(II) of such subsection insofar as it relates to a single offense of simple possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana if—

(1)

(A) in the case of any immigrant it is established to the satisfaction of the Attorney General that—

(i)

the alien is inadmissible only under subparagraph (D)(i) or (D)(ii) of such subsection or the activities for which the alien is inadmissible occurred more than 15 years before the date of the alien’s application for a visa, admission, or adjustment of status,
(ii)

the admission to the United States of such alien would not be contrary to the national welfare, safety, or security of the United States, and
(iii)

the alien has been rehabilitated; or
(B)

in the case of an immigrant who is the spouse, parent, son, or daughter of a citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence if it is established to the satisfaction of the Attorney General that the alien’s denial of admission would result in extreme hardship to the United States citizen or lawfully resident spouse, parent, son, or daughter of such alien; or
(C)

the alien is a VAWA self-petitioner; and
(2)

the Attorney General, in his discretion, and pursuant to such terms, conditions and procedures as he may by regulations prescribe, has consented to the alien’s applying or reapplying for a visa, for admission to the United States, or adjustment of status.
No waiver shall be provided under this subsection in the case of an alien who has been convicted of (or who has admitted committing acts that constitute) murder or criminal acts involving torture, or an attempt or conspiracy to commit murder or a criminal act involving torture. No waiver shall be granted under this subsection in the case of an alien who has previously been admitted to the United States as an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence if either since the date of such admission the alien has been convicted of an aggravated felony or the alien has not lawfully resided continuously in the United States for a period of not less than 7 years immediately preceding the date of initiation of proceedings to remove the alien from the United States. No court shall have jurisdiction to review a decision of the Attorney General to grant or deny a waiver under this subsection.
(i) Admission of immigrant inadmissible for fraud or willful misrepresentation of material fact

(1)

The Attorney General may, in the discretion of the Attorney General, waive the application of clause (i) of subsection (a)(6)(C) in the case of an immigrant who is the spouse, son, or daughter of a United States citizen or of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence if it is established to the satisfaction of the Attorney General that the refusal of admission to the United States of such immigrant alien would result in extreme hardship to the citizen or lawfully resident spouse or parent of such an alien or, in the case of a VAWA self-petitioner, the alien demonstrates extreme hardship to the alien or the alien’s United States citizen, lawful permanent resident, or qualified alien parent or child.
(2)

No court shall have jurisdiction to review a decision or action of the Attorney General regarding a waiver under paragraph (1).
(j) Limitation on immigration of foreign medical graduates

(1) The additional requirements referred to i

GMO apples that never brown could hit stores soon

January 22, 2017

http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/20/health/apples-genetically-modified-on-sale-soon/index.html

Story highlights

  • The USDA approved the GMO apples nearly two years ago
  • Non-browning apples will only be available in Midwest stores for now, company says

(CNN)For a select few apple lovers in the US, a Golden Delicious slice will no longer turn brown as the first genetically modified apples are expected to go on sale early next month.

A small amount of Arctic brand sliced and packaged Golden Delicious apples, produced by Okanagan Specialty Fruits in British Columbia, Canada, will hit the shelves of 10 stores in the Midwest in February and March, Neal Carter, the company’s founder and president, told the agricultural news website Capital Press. Arctic’s website lists the apples as being available early this year in some test markets.
Carter said Midwestern stores were the first choice because they seemed like a good fit demographically and in size. He wouldn’t name the stores, stating it’s up to retailers to announce that they’ll be selling the non-browning apples.
“We’re very optimistic with respect to this product because people love it at trade shows,” he said earlier this month. “It’s a great product and the eating quality is excellent.”
Along with not turning brown, the apples should also be crispier in texture — possibly winning over some picky eaters.
Nearly two years ago, the US Department of Agriculture approved the US’s first genetically modified apples.
The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service granted its approval based on “a final plant pest risk assessment that finds the GE (genetically engineered) apples are unlikely to pose a plant pest risk to agriculture and other plants in the United States … [and] deregulation is not likely to have a significant impact on the human environment,” as stated in their report.
The Food and Drug Administration is not required to approve genetically engineered crops for consumption. Most companies engage in a voluntary safety review process with the FDA, and Okanagan did that.
The US Apple Association was wary of Arctic’s apple after the USDA approval, but the group has since taken a more neutral stance.
“US Apple supports consumer choice in the apples and apple products they select. Consumers will be able to decide whether to try the new, “non-browning” apples, and ultimately, the marketplace will determine whether there is a demand for them,” state the association on their website.

Browning is natural, but…

There’s nothing technically wrong with an apple that browns.
It all comes down to oxygen being introduced into plant tissue when an apple is sliced, bruised or bitten.
The US Apple association explains: “The degree to which an apple browns depends upon that variety’s natural levels of polyphenoloxydase (PPL) and Vitamin C (ascorbic acid). The lower the level of PPL, the less the variety will brown.
But Okanagan Specialty Fruits describes the process a bit differently: “Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) found in one part of the cell mixes with polyphenolics found in another part of the cell. (PPO is a plant enzyme. Polyphenolics are one of the many types of chemical substrate that serve various purposes, including supplying apples with their aroma and flavor.) When PPO and polyphenolics mix, brown-toned melanin is left behind,” they state on their website.
When brown, an apple isn’t necessarily rotten, but Okanagan claim the benefits of non-browning apples go beyond the visual appeal and a reduction in waste. The company says stores or producers often use expensive chemicals to delay the browning of apples and many shoppers frown at the idea of chemicals or pesticides on their produce.
The consensus among scientists and nutritionists is that GMOs are safe, but some consumers are still turned off by GMO labels.
Though the apples are only being trialed in the Midwest, the company have faith they will soon become a welcome option elsewhere.